American Academy of Dermatology Statement on the Safety of Sunscreen

Schaumburg, IL (May 19, 2017) — Statement from Henry W. Lim, MD, FAAD, President, American Academy of Dermatology

“The American Academy of Dermatology wants to emphasize that sunscreen remains a safe, effective form of sun protection. As one component of a daily sun-protection strategy, sunscreen is an important tool in the fight against skin cancer, including melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

“Current scientific data does not support claims that sunscreen ingredients are toxic or a hazard to human health. Rather, evidence supports the benefits of applying sunscreen to minimize short- and long-term damage to the skin from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays.

“Sunscreen products contain one or more active drug ingredients —compounds that absorb, scatter or reflect UV light — and are regulated as over-the-counter drugs by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has several safety and effectiveness regulations in place that govern the manufacture and marketing of all sunscreen products, including safety data on its ingredients. 

“To reduce the risk of skin cancer and premature aging, dermatologists continue to recommend generously applying a water-resistant, broad-spectrum sunscreen – that protects against both types of ultraviolet radiation (UVA and UVB) – with an SPF 30 or higher, in conjunction with other sun-safe practices such as limiting sun exposure, seeking shade, and wearing sun-protective clothing, hats and sunglasses.

“To ensure the most effective protection from sunscreen, you should apply enough sunscreen to cover all exposed skin — for most adults, this is about 1 ounce, or enough to fill a shot glass. Sunscreen should be applied 15 minutes before sun exposure and reapplied every two hours, when outdoors, or after swimming or sweating.

“There are a wide range of sunscreen products on the market today; choose the one that follows the AAD’s recommendations in the form that you are most likely to use. We encourage anyone with questions about sun protection and sunscreen ingredients to talk to a board-certified dermatologist, who can use his or her expertise to help you develop an effective sun protection plan.”

American Academy of Dermatology Statement on the Safety of Sunscreen

Schaumburg, IL (May 19, 2017) — Statement from Henry W. Lim, MD, FAAD, President, American Academy of Dermatology

“The American Academy of Dermatology wants to emphasize that sunscreen remains a safe, effective form of sun protection. As one component of a daily sun-protection strategy, sunscreen is an important tool in the fight against skin cancer, including melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

“Current scientific data does not support claims that sunscreen ingredients are toxic or a hazard to human health. Rather, evidence supports the benefits of applying sunscreen to minimize short- and long-term damage to the skin from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays.

“Sunscreen products contain one or more active drug ingredients —compounds that absorb, scatter or reflect UV light — and are regulated as over-the-counter drugs by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has several safety and effectiveness regulations in place that govern the manufacture and marketing of all sunscreen products, including safety data on its ingredients. 

“To reduce the risk of skin cancer and premature aging, dermatologists continue to recommend generously applying a water-resistant, broad-spectrum sunscreen – that protects against both types of ultraviolet radiation (UVA and UVB) – with an SPF 30 or higher, in conjunction with other sun-safe practices such as limiting sun exposure, seeking shade, and wearing sun-protective clothing, hats and sunglasses.

“To ensure the most effective protection from sunscreen, you should apply enough sunscreen to cover all exposed skin — for most adults, this is about 1 ounce, or enough to fill a shot glass. Sunscreen should be applied 15 minutes before sun exposure and reapplied every two hours, when outdoors, or after swimming or sweating.

“There are a wide range of sunscreen products on the market today; choose the one that follows the AAD’s recommendations in the form that you are most likely to use. We encourage anyone with questions about sun protection and sunscreen ingredients to talk to a board-certified dermatologist, who can use his or her expertise to help you develop an effective sun protection plan.”

FDA warns Americans about risk of inaccurate results from certain lead tests

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning Americans that certain lead tests manufactured by Magellan Diagnostics may provide inaccurate results for some children and adults in the United States. The CDC recommends that parents of children younger than six years (72 months) of age, and currently pregnant women and nursing mothers who have been tested for lead exposure consult a health care professional about whether they should be retested.

“The FDA is deeply concerned by this situation and is warning laboratories and health care professionals that they should not use any Magellan Diagnostics’ lead tests with blood drawn from a vein,” said Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “The agency is aggressively investigating this complicated issue to determine the cause of the inaccurate results and working with the CDC and other public health partners to address the problem as quickly as possible.

The FDA’s warning is based on currently available data that indicate Magellan lead tests, when performed on blood drawn from a vein, may provide results that are lower than the actual level of lead in the blood. Currently, the FDA believes the issue may date back to 2014. The warning includes all four of Magellan Diagnostics’ lead testing systems: LeadCare; LeadCare II; LeadCare Plus; and LeadCare Ultra. At this time, all LeadCare systems can be used with blood from a finger or heel stick, including the LeadCare II system – a system found in many doctors’ offices and clinics. In addition, some laboratories offer other methods of lead testing, which are not believed to be affected at this time.

The CDC is recommending that health care professionals retest children younger than six years (72 months) of age at the time of this alert (May 17, 2017) if their test was conducted using blood drawn from a vein using any Magellan Diagnostics’ LeadCare System tests and received a result of less than 10 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL). The CDC also recommends that women, who are currently pregnant or nursing and were tested in this manner while pregnant or nursing, get retested. Other adults who are concerned about their risk or the risk to an older child should speak to their health care professional about whether they should be retested.

“We understand that parents of children and others affected by this problem will be concerned about what this means for their health,” said Patrick Breysse, Ph.D., director of the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health. “While most children likely received an accurate test result, it is important to identify those whose exposure was missed, or underestimated, so that they can receive proper care. For this reason, because every child’s health is important, the CDC recommends that those at greatest risk be retested.”

Lead exposure can affect nearly every system in the body, produces no obvious symptoms, and frequently goes unrecognized, potentially leading to serious health issues. Lead poisoning is particularly dangerous to infants and young children. While recommendations for lead screening differ from state to state, all states require children to be screened for lead exposure. Some adults are also at risk for lead exposure, including those who work around products or materials that contain lead. 

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, promotes and protects the public health by, among other things, assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges. 

Diamond highlights damage pathways in lithium-ion batteries

Researchers from University College London (UCL), the NASA-Johnson Space Center, the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Warwick and the National Physical Laboratory have used Diamond’s I12 beamline to investigate how lithium-ion batteries behave under short-circuit conditions.

“Lithium-ion batteries are ubiquitous in today’s society and are used in a range of applications from mobile phones to electric vehicles,” explains first author, Donal Finegan, who is based at UCL. “Although rare, lithium-ion batteries can and do fail, sometimes catastrophically, and these failures often complete within 1-2 seconds and involve a lot of movement and dynamics.

To induce failure, the team inserted a device capable of generating an internal short circuit on-demand and at a pre-determined location into commercially available Li-ion batteries. The team used the device to gain insight into cell design vulnerabilities by causing cell walls to rupture or cells to burst open. Using high-speed X-ray imaging, researchers monitored what happened to the structure of the cells in real-time, as the short circuit drove the catastrophic failure process that propagated through cells and modules.

Individual cells, as well as small cell modules, were tested at Diamond and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France under conditions that represented a worst-case battery failure scenario. Short circuits were initiated inside the batteries at ~60 ˚C. During the failure process, cell temperatures reached in excess of 1085 ˚C.

“After visiting ESRF and processing the data, we discovered that with a little more work and additional experiments we could create a much more comprehensive study,” continues Finegan. “Fortunately we were able to get the beamtime at Diamond where we could build on the earlier work we’d done at ESRF.”

“The exceptionally high-intensity X-ray flux at Diamond provides the high-speed imaging capability necessary to capture such rapid events in real time,” adds Michael Drakopoulos, Principal Beamline Scientist on the I12: Joint Engineering, Environmental, and Processing (JEEP) beamline. “This allows our users to study, in detail, the fastest failure mechanisms of commercial cell designs, and use the results to guide design-improvements for higher performance and safe lithium ion batteries.”

From analysing the high-speed imaging frame by frame, the team looked at the effects of gas pockets forming, venting and increasing temperatures on the layers inside two distinct commercial Li-ion batteries and identified consistent failure mechanisms.

The team now plans to examine how these new insights can be used to improve the safety of commercial battery and module designs. For example, researchers will study how the rupture of the highest energy density commercial cells can be prevented and how to reduce the risk of cell-to-cell propagation.
 

Global Radiation Therapy Devices Market 2017; Region Wise Analysis of Top Players in Market by its Types and Application

Radiation Therapy Devices Market Report Forecast 2017-2021 is a respected source of insightful data for business planners. Europe Radiation Therapy Devices Market provides the industry overview with growth analysis and historical & futuristic cost, revenue, demand and supply data.

The research analysts provide an elaborate description of the value chain and its distributor analysis. This Radiation Therapy Devices Market industry report study provides analysis based on Geographical Regions, Manufacturers, Applications, Types, Drivers, Opportunities, and Challenges which enhances the understanding, scope and application of this report.

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Next part of the Europe Radiation Therapy Devices Market analysis report speaks about the manufacturing process. The process is analysed thoroughly with respect three points, viz. raw material and equipment suppliers, various manufacturing associated costs (material cost, labour cost, etc.) and the actual process.

After the basic information, the report sheds light on the production, production plants, their capacities, Europe production and revenue are studied. Also, the Europe Radiation Therapy Devices Market growth in various regions and R&D status are also covered.

Radiation Therapy Devices Market by Application:

Hospital
Clinic

Top key players of Radiation Therapy Devices Market:

Varian Medical Systems
Elekta AB
Accuray Incorporated
IBA (Ion Beam Applications Sa)
Nordion
C. R. Bard
Isoray Medical
Raysearch Laboratories AB
Mevion Medical Systems
Mitsubishi Electric Corporation
And Many Others….

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Further in the report, Europe Radiation Therapy Devices Market is examined for price, cost and gross revenue. These three points are analysed for types, companies and regions. In prolongation with this data sale price for various types, applications and region is also included. The Radiation Therapy Devices Market Industry consumption for major regions is given. Additionally, type wise and application wise consumption figures are also given.

Europe Radiation Therapy Devices Market report including definitions, classifications, applications drivers, restraints, opportunities and market chain structure. The Radiation Therapy Devices Market analysis is provided for the international market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions development status.

Radiation Therapy Devices Market by Product Type:

External Beam Radiation Therapy
Internal Beam Radiotherapy
Stereotactic Technology
Radiation Therapy Devices Market by Region:

North America
Europe
China
Japan
Southeast Asia
India
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With the help of supply and consumption data, gap between these two is also explained.

To provide information on competitive landscape, this report includes detailed profiles of Radiation Therapy Devices Market key players. For each player, product details, capacity, price, cost, gross and revenue numbers are given. Their contact information is provided for better understanding.

Major Topics Covered in Europe Radiation Therapy Devices Market Research Report Are as Follows:

Radiation Therapy Devices Market Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders

Marketing Channel
Direct Marketing
Indirect Marketing
Marketing Channel Development Trend
Market Positioning
Pricing Strategy
Brand Strategy
Target Client
Distributors/Traders List
Radiation Therapy Devices Market Effect Factors Analysis

Technology Progress/Risk
Substitutes Threat
Technology Progress in Related Industry
Consumer Needs/Customer Preference Change
Economic/Political Environmental Change
Europe Radiation Therapy Devices Market Forecast 2017-2021

Monica Pham: Advancing nuclear power and empowering girls

When she was 16, Monica Pham mapped out her future. “My chemistry teacher was talking about how atoms could generate unlimited power,” Pham recalls. “I asked her what kind of person worked in this field, and when she said a nuclear engineer, I decided that’s what I wanted to be.”

Today, as a college sophomore pursuing a degree in the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering (NSE), Pham could not be happier with her decision. “That weird, defining moment in high school has worked out well for me, because with my interests in energy and engineering, NSE is a really great fit.

In addition to her full plate of NSE classes, such as 22.01 (Introduction to Nuclear Engineering and Ionizing Radiation) and 22.06 (Engineering of Nuclear Systems), Pham is engaged in research at the Collaboration for Science and Technology with Accelerators and Radiation (CSTAR), a joint laboratory of NSE and the Plasma Science and Fusion Center.

“I remembered touring the CSTAR facility during freshman pre-orientation, and thought this would be a great way to get my first real experience in nuclear engineering,” Pham says.

Pham’s project, one of a number at CSTAR, is under the supervision of assistant professor Zachary Hartwig, and involves the development of a system for diagnosing materials used in tokamaks — nuclear fusion reactors. Fusion energy harnesses the power of super-hot plasma, the fuel of stars, to generate enormous amounts of energy. Tokamaks confine and control plasma through the use of magnetic fields.

Before fusion energy can become a viable source of energy, critical issues must be addressed. Hartwig’s research, part of a five-year study devised by NSE Professor Dennis Whyte, focuses on some central questions: What are the potentially destructive impacts of plasma on tokamak components, and can these effects be assessed inside the fiery furnace of a typically inaccessible tokamak chamber?

This is where Pham comes in. She is part of a team using a particle accelerator to blast a beam of atomic particles at materials used in tokamak components. This research is an initial step in developing a full-scale diagnostic technique to measure the impacts of harsh conditions on plasma-facing components in a major fusion facility.

“Because plasma is kind of crazy, there is a lot of erosion and deposition to these materials in a tokamak,” she says “Previous diagnostic techniques are all ex situ — you have to take components out of the chamber afterwards to see how plasma affected them — so this technique is novel and could really help with new fusion reactor designs.”

Some days Pham will help assemble the experiment, setting up the small metallic targets at the end of the accelerator beamline. Other days, she collects data from the detectors, plotting the intensity of the yield of atomic particles such as gamma radiation against the intensity of the accelerator beam.

“I’m learning a lot about how to set up and run experiments from them,” she says. “It’s both challenging and fun, especially when we have to troubleshoot an experiment that isn’t working as planned.”

After four straight terms on this project, Pham looks forward to the potential publication of research in which she has been involved. “One of the graduate students hopes to publish, including data I collected last year,” she says. “It would be kind of cool to be an undergraduate and a co-author.”

When not in class or in the laboratory, Pham makes time for the MIT chapter of the Society of Women Engineers. As festival chair, she sets up workshops and activities to engage girls and young women in science and engineering.

Pham recalls times during secondary school when she “was not taken as seriously as boys who wanted to go into engineering,” she says. “People would say to me, ‘Are you sure you want to do that; it seems pretty hard.’” As a result of these experiences, she says, “I want to empower girls to feel they belong in these fields.”

At such venues as the Cambridge Science Festival, and the USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington, Pham runs open houses intended to introduce girls both to fun science, like using lemon juice to polish a penny, and to female science and engineering role models such as herself. “Some kids ask what it’s like to be a woman engineer or an MIT student, and I tell them it’s really cool,” she says.

She has proof this outreach makes a difference. “One time I was helping an eight-year-old girl build a mini-catapult, and she turned to me and said, ‘I was going to ask for a robot for Christmas and now I want to build a robot myself,’” says Pham. “It was an amazing moment, and showed me my efforts could really pay off.”

PPG launches PPG TIMELESS Stain at national home improvement center

CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP, Pa., April 12, 2017 – Calling all woodcare enthusiasts, barbecue connoisseurs, stargazers and fresh-air appreciators: This summer, enjoy your outdoor living space more than ever. Wood decks, fences and siding deserve both the exceptional protection and the enduring beauty offered by new PPG TIMELESS™ stain. Providing gorgeous results to be enjoyed for seasons to come, PPG Timeless stain by PPG, is now available exclusively at THE HOME DEPOT® locations and at homedepot.com.

“Brought to you by PPG, a global leader in paints, stains and coatings innovation and a brand trusted by professionals for over 130 years, PPG Timeless stain is the first product that prominently carries the PPG name in a major home improvement center,” said Sara Braun, PPG marketing director. “PPG products are trusted and chosen by professionals to complete jobs when their reputations are on the line. With PPG Timeless stain, DIYers also can feel confident that the product they are choosing will allow them to be proud of beautiful, professional-quality results achieved with their own hands. And, their hard work will pay off tenfold when they can enjoy their outdoor spaces with family and friends for years to come.”

 

The PPG Timeless Stain transparent product lineup delivers advanced penetrating oil technology that works its way deep into the wood to beautify and protect from the inside out. Using proprietary PPG urethane-fortified technology, PPG Timeless stain delivers exceptional protection against the elements like sun and water. This technology allows the stain to be flexible so it can help wood to withstand more of the expansion and contraction that naturally occur – when it gets wet and then dries, or gets cold and then hot – and cause it to crack. With its powerful ultraviolet (UV) radiation absorbers, the stain also protects both the condition and color of the wood it coats.

 

PPG Timeless stain provides decks, fences and more with enduring beauty through rich, vibrant and deep colors, giving homeowners a beautiful backdrop for entertaining and enjoying. The line’s palette, developed by global PPG color experts, offers a curated color selection and uses only the most durable pigments. The stain is available in five finishes: transparent penetrating wood oil; satin semi-transparent luxury wood finish; and semi-transparent, semi-solid, and solid color stain-and-sealant-in-one options.  

 

For more information or to locate The Home Depot stores near you, visit https://diy.ppg.com/.

 
PPG’s architectural coatings business in the U.S. and Canada is an industry leader in residential and commercial coatings, delivering the latest technologies and operational advancements through its strong portfolio of brands. It manufactures and sells interior and exterior paints, stains, caulks, repair products, adhesives and sealants for homeowners and professionals. Its distribution network includes more than 15,000 touchpoints through company-owned stores, independent dealer locations and all major home improvement centers across the U.S. and Canada. Visit ppg.com/ac for more information.

 
PPG: WE PROTECT AND BEAUTIFY THE WORLD™
At PPG (NYSE:PPG), we work every day to develop and deliver the paints, coatings and materials that our customers have trusted for more than 130 years. Through dedication and creativity, we solve our customers’ biggest challenges, collaborating closely to find the right path forward. With headquarters in Pittsburgh, we operate and innovate in more than 70 countries and reported net sales of $14.8 billion in 2016. We serve customers in construction, consumer products, industrial and transportation markets and aftermarkets. To learn more, visit www.ppg.com.

 
We protect and beautify the world is a trademark and the PPG Logo is a registered trademark of PPG Industries Ohio, Inc.
Timeless is a trademark of PPG Architectural Finishes, Inc.
The Home Depot is a registered trademark of Homer TLC, Inc., and is used under license.
©2017 PPG Industries, Inc. All rights reserved.

Arthur Sweetman Re-Appointed as a C.D. Howe Institute Research Fellow

April 4, 2017 – William Robson, President and CEO of the C.D. Howe Institute, announces the re-appointment of Arthur Sweetman, Ontario Research Chair in Health Human Resources, McMaster University, as a Research Fellow.

“Arthur’s ability to frame research strategies, and his deep knowledge of key areas such as healthcare delivery and labour markets make him a highly valuable collaborator,” commented Robson. “The C.D. Howe Institute’s work in health and human capital is much stronger thanks to his input.”

Dr. Sweetman focuses on issues in health human resources in Ontario, including the shortage in doctors, health budgets, and the number of medical radiation technologists and pharmacists needed in the province.

Throughout his extensive academic career, Dr. Sweetman has demonstrated leadership in research, teaching, and bridging academia and policy-making. His extensive research in immigration and education policy compliments his work in health human resources, for which work-place training and immigration are integral parts of workforce strategy.

Prior to his post as Research Chair, Dr. Sweetman was the Director of the School of Policy Studies at Queen’s University. He has a PhD in Economics from McMaster University.

For more information please contact: C.D. Howe Institute at 416-865-1904; email: media@cdhowe.org.

The C.D. Howe Institute is an independent not-for-profit research institute whose mission is to raise living standards by fostering economically sound public policies. Widely considered to be Canada’s most influential think tank, the Institute is a trusted source of essential policy intelligence, distinguished by research that is nonpartisan, evidence-based and subject to definitive expert review.

Arthur Sweetman Re-Appointed as a C.D. Howe Institute Research Fellow

April 4, 2017 – William Robson, President and CEO of the C.D. Howe Institute, announces the re-appointment of Arthur Sweetman, Ontario Research Chair in Health Human Resources, McMaster University, as a Research Fellow.

“Arthur’s ability to frame research strategies, and his deep knowledge of key areas such as healthcare delivery and labour markets make him a highly valuable collaborator,” commented Robson. “The C.D. Howe Institute’s work in health and human capital is much stronger thanks to his input.”

Dr. Sweetman focuses on issues in health human resources in Ontario, including the shortage in doctors, health budgets, and the number of medical radiation technologists and pharmacists needed in the province.

Throughout his extensive academic career, Dr. Sweetman has demonstrated leadership in research, teaching, and bridging academia and policy-making. His extensive research in immigration and education policy compliments his work in health human resources, for which work-place training and immigration are integral parts of workforce strategy.

Prior to his post as Research Chair, Dr. Sweetman was the Director of the School of Policy Studies at Queen’s University. He has a PhD in Economics from McMaster University.

For more information please contact: C.D. Howe Institute at 416-865-1904; email: media@cdhowe.org.

The C.D. Howe Institute is an independent not-for-profit research institute whose mission is to raise living standards by fostering economically sound public policies. Widely considered to be Canada’s most influential think tank, the Institute is a trusted source of essential policy intelligence, distinguished by research that is nonpartisan, evidence-based and subject to definitive expert review.

Arthur Sweetman Re-Appointed as a C.D. Howe Institute Research Fellow

April 4, 2017 – William Robson, President and CEO of the C.D. Howe Institute, announces the re-appointment of Arthur Sweetman, Ontario Research Chair in Health Human Resources, McMaster University, as a Research Fellow.

“Arthur’s ability to frame research strategies, and his deep knowledge of key areas such as healthcare delivery and labour markets make him a highly valuable collaborator,” commented Robson. “The C.D. Howe Institute’s work in health and human capital is much stronger thanks to his input.”

Dr. Sweetman focuses on issues in health human resources in Ontario, including the shortage in doctors, health budgets, and the number of medical radiation technologists and pharmacists needed in the province.

Throughout his extensive academic career, Dr. Sweetman has demonstrated leadership in research, teaching, and bridging academia and policy-making. His extensive research in immigration and education policy compliments his work in health human resources, for which work-place training and immigration are integral parts of workforce strategy.

Prior to his post as Research Chair, Dr. Sweetman was the Director of the School of Policy Studies at Queen’s University. He has a PhD in Economics from McMaster University.

For more information please contact: C.D. Howe Institute at 416-865-1904; email: media@cdhowe.org.

The C.D. Howe Institute is an independent not-for-profit research institute whose mission is to raise living standards by fostering economically sound public policies. Widely considered to be Canada’s most influential think tank, the Institute is a trusted source of essential policy intelligence, distinguished by research that is nonpartisan, evidence-based and subject to definitive expert review.