Bay Area Woman Raises Awareness of Dangers of Pesticides to Health of Farmworkers

iCrowdNewswire – May 29, 2017

Victoria de Alba

 

— Groundbreaking Campaign closes with Grand Finale Gala on June 3rd at The Fairmont San Francisco —

 

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – May 29, 2017 – (HISPANICIZE WIRE) – In March, Victoria Sanchez De Alba, Bay Area businesswoman and San Francisco candidate for San Francisco’s The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) 2017 Woman of the Year, embarked on a 10-week mission to fund a $50,000 LLS research grant to combat blood cancers related to the use of pesticides. Sanchez De Alba’s campaign, Por Vida Juntos We Can Beat Cancer, concludes with LLS’s Grand Finale Gala on Saturday, June 3, 2017 from 6:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m. at The Fairmont San Francisco, 950 Mason Street in San Francisco. For tickets, please visit: http://bit.ly/2p3ZZze. If unable to attend the Gala, tax-deductible donations can be made at: http://bit.ly/vsda2017.

 

Sanchez De Alba’s mission is to tell the world that pesticides affect all of us, especially people exposed to pesticides while working in agricultural fields. Such exposure has been scientifically proven to increase the risk of getting cancer(1). Her work comes from the heart: Por Vida Juntos We Can Beat Cancer is in honor of Sanchez De Alba’s father, Sebastian Sanchez, who worked in the Salinas Valley, CA agricultural fields for more than 40 years and died of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a cancer associated with pesticide exposure(2,3) in 2002.

 

Sanchez De Alba’s campaign goal of $50,000 represents the cost of funding a cancer research lab for one year. Funds raised will be earmarked for research to fight non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

 

“My goal is to raise awareness about the serious health risks facing all farmworkers, and to help put an end to cancers that are shortening the lives of the hard-working people who put food on our tables,” said Sanchez De Alba.

 

According to LLS — the leading source of free, specialized blood cancer information, education, and support for patients, survivors, families, and healthcare professionals — blood cancers are the 3rd largest cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. and the largest type of pediatric cancer. Every three minutes, someone is diagnosed with blood cancer, and every nine minutes someone dies from it.

 

“We invite everyone to party for a tremendously important cause by joining us for the Grand Finale Gala on June 3rd at The Fairmont San Francisco,” said Sanchez De Alba. “It’s the last chance for people to support this vital campaign. And if you can’t join us at the Gala, we encourage people to make a donation. Any amount is welcome and will make a difference in people’s lives.”

 

Grand Finale Gala: Por Vida Juntos We Can Beat Cancer

 

WHEN: Saturday, June 3, 6:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m.

WHERE: The Fairmont San Francisco, 950 Mason Street in San Francisco

 

BUY TICKETS FOR GALA: http://bit.ly/2p3ZZze

 

DONATE TO THE CAMPAIGN: http://bit.ly/vsda2017

 

To learn more about LLS, please visit: www.lls.org.

 

(1) Farmworker Justice: http://bit.ly/1SknqK2
(2) Annual Review of Public Health: http://bit.ly/2npZy2o
(3) Agricultural Pesticides Linked to Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma by Dr. Mercola: http://bit.ly/2nuxs2F

 

About Victoria Sanchez De Alba, 2017 Woman of the Year for LLS:
Victoria Sanchez De Alba is president and owner of De Alba Communications, a well-respected multicultural media and public relations consultancy. Her agency provides communications consultation to a wide range of industries and service areas, raising public awareness through strategic media outreach in both general and ethnic press. Sanchez De Alba is passionate about helping create a more socially responsible world, and has a proven track record for creating public relations campaigns that reach diverse audiences. Her coverage of socially relevant topics includes the California State Legislature; health and wellness; health status disparities faced by various races and ethnic groups; public education; workers’ rights; LGBT concerns; domestic abuse; bridging the gap in technology; and the environment. For more information, please visit www.dealba.net.

Warren named associate VP of development

Kathi Dantley Warren, currently the senior executive director of development for Duke Cancer Institute, has been named associate vice president of development at Rice University, effective July 10.

Kathi Dantley Warren

With more than 17 years of experience at higher education and medical institutions, Warren will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of individual fundraising programs and also oversee various departments within the Office of Development and Alumni Relations, including gift planning, major gifts, school-based fundraising and annual giving.

All of us at Rice are incredibly excited that Kathi will be joining the Development and Alumni Relations team,” said Vice President Darrow Zeidenstein. “Educated as a scientist, Kathi brings incredible smarts and a wealth of development experience from her work at Cornell and Duke, two of the best development programs in the country. I have zero doubt that both faculty and staff will enjoy working with Kathi as we seek to secure resources to enhance Rice’s mission.”

In her development role with one of the original eight comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute, Warren transformed the fundraising program from a yearly $18 million enterprise to a $30 million enterprise and successfully completed a $200 million campaign.

Before joining the Duke Cancer Institute and Duke Health in Durham, N.C., in 2014, Warren served as assistant dean for alumni affairs and development at Cornell University’s College of Engineering, where she created its first alumni affairs and development strategic plan and alumni engagement plan. Over a four-year period she increased annual revenues by 245 percent – from $22.7 million to more than $56 million – and helped achieve the second-best fundraising year in the college’s history. Through philanthropy she also enabled the college to create and endow several new programs, including an engineering leadership program and teaching excellence institute.

“It gave me great joy to see the legacy that this created,” Warren said. “Faculty and students are benefiting from those programs that were the result of a partnership with donors and institutional leadership.”

Warren has an M.A. in cell and molecular biology and microbiology from Duke University and a B.A. in biology from Hampton University. She found herself drawn to the development profession after thinking about how she had been impacted as the recipient of an undergraduate scholarship and graduate fellowship. She learned more about the profession that made that scholarship and fellowship possible and became a development associate at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, College Park, where she worked her way up to associate director of development.

She met a refugee from an African country at a University of Maryland scholarship event for donors and recipients and kept in touch with him. After graduating, the refugee got a job at the United Nations and then returned to his home country to try to assist people there, but none of that would have happened if he had not received the scholarship. “That was hugely impactful,” Warren said. “The scholarship changed not only his life, but the lives of others.” She said experiences like this helped her to find meaning in the development profession. “It’s very rewarding,” she said.

Warren’s career in development includes more than 10 years of leading teams during fundraising campaigns of more than $1 billion. She said the best institutions find a way to blend the scientific tenets of fundraising with “the art of cultivating meaningful, lifelong relationships with an institution,” and Rice’s ability to do that was a key factor in her decision to join the university’s development team.

“Rice has an excellent story to tell and a visionary leader in President David Leebron,” Warren said. She noted that Rice’s prestige as a research institution, its liberal arts programs, its residential college system and its unique landscape in an urban setting are “very compelling and really engender not just investments but partnerships with donors” and can lead to “transformational gifts.”

Originally from Alexandria, Va., Warren said she is excited to come to Rice and to make a home in Texas for her family, which includes her husband, Stephen; her 11-year-old son, Bennett; and Pearl, a Piston terrier who is “the sweetest dog on the planet.” Warren is an avid sports enthusiast who likes to run, lift weights and play basketball with her son. She also enjoys cooking and acrylic painting.

Rice course teaches students about philanthropy

A new class offered this semester through Rice University’s Center for Civic Leadership (CCL) taught students about the role of philanthropy in addressing social issues and gave them real experience with awarding grants to nonprofit organizations.

Students pictured with Vida Avery and CCL staff. Photo submitted by CCL.

Thirteen undergraduates and one graduate student enrolled in “Giving to Learn,” a three-credit academic course launched this spring. They studied with Vida Avery, a Houston fundraising professional, to learn about the history and role of philanthropy and to learn to be grant makers themselves.

Throughout the semester, students requested proposals from nonprofit organizations that already had a relationship with the CCL and vetted the organizations and proposals through a rigorous process. After deliberation, the students chose five organizations to receive grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.

Funding for the course was provided by the Philanthropy Lab, a Dallas-based national foundation that supports high-quality programs in philanthropy education. All of the funding went toward the awards distributed by the students.

Rice students present a grant to Agape Development. Photo submitted by CCL.

The Montrose Center, Agape Development, La Raza United, Undies for Everyone and The 5th Ward Enrichment Program received awards at a May 1 event in Farnsworth Pavilion.

The original motivation for pursuing this course and partnership with the Philanthropy Lab was the Rich Family endowment, Circle of Giving and the encouragement of the Rich family for us to implement this type of programming for Rice students,” said Danika Brown, director of curriculum and fellowships for the CCL. “This semester’s course was an inaugural offering, but we plan to continue to find support to continue the course in the future.”

Brown said the CCL is committed to continuing to support unique opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning that has real impact on them and the surrounding community.

The CCL plans to offer the course again next spring. For more information, visit https://ccl.rice.edu/.

Rice course teaches students about philanthropy

A new class offered this semester through Rice University’s Center for Civic Leadership (CCL) taught students about the role of philanthropy in addressing social issues and gave them real experience with awarding grants to nonprofit organizations.

Students pictured with Vida Avery and CCL staff. Photo submitted by CCL.

Thirteen undergraduates and one graduate student enrolled in “Giving to Learn,” a three-credit academic course launched this spring. They studied with Vida Avery, a Houston fundraising professional, to learn about the history and role of philanthropy and to learn to be grant makers themselves.

Throughout the semester, students requested proposals from nonprofit organizations that already had a relationship with the CCL and vetted the organizations and proposals through a rigorous process. After deliberation, the students chose five organizations to receive grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.

Funding for the course was provided by the Philanthropy Lab, a Dallas-based national foundation that supports high-quality programs in philanthropy education. All of the funding went toward the awards distributed by the students.

Rice students present a grant to Agape Development. Photo submitted by CCL.

The Montrose Center, Agape Development, La Raza United, Undies for Everyone and The 5th Ward Enrichment Program received awards at a May 1 event in Farnsworth Pavilion.

The original motivation for pursuing this course and partnership with the Philanthropy Lab was the Rich Family endowment, Circle of Giving and the encouragement of the Rich family for us to implement this type of programming for Rice students,” said Danika Brown, director of curriculum and fellowships for the CCL. “This semester’s course was an inaugural offering, but we plan to continue to find support to continue the course in the future.”

Brown said the CCL is committed to continuing to support unique opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning that has real impact on them and the surrounding community.

The CCL plans to offer the course again next spring. For more information, visit https://ccl.rice.edu/.

Rice course teaches students about philanthropy

A new class offered this semester through Rice University’s Center for Civic Leadership (CCL) taught students about the role of philanthropy in addressing social issues and gave them real experience with awarding grants to nonprofit organizations.

Students pictured with Vida Avery and CCL staff. Photo submitted by CCL.

Thirteen undergraduates and one graduate student enrolled in “Giving to Learn,” a three-credit academic course launched this spring. They studied with Vida Avery, a Houston fundraising professional, to learn about the history and role of philanthropy and to learn to be grant makers themselves.

Throughout the semester, students requested proposals from nonprofit organizations that already had a relationship with the CCL and vetted the organizations and proposals through a rigorous process. After deliberation, the students chose five organizations to receive grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.

Funding for the course was provided by the Philanthropy Lab, a Dallas-based national foundation that supports high-quality programs in philanthropy education. All of the funding went toward the awards distributed by the students.

Rice students present a grant to Agape Development. Photo submitted by CCL.

The Montrose Center, Agape Development, La Raza United, Undies for Everyone and The 5th Ward Enrichment Program received awards at a May 1 event in Farnsworth Pavilion.

The original motivation for pursuing this course and partnership with the Philanthropy Lab was the Rich Family endowment, Circle of Giving and the encouragement of the Rich family for us to implement this type of programming for Rice students,” said Danika Brown, director of curriculum and fellowships for the CCL. “This semester’s course was an inaugural offering, but we plan to continue to find support to continue the course in the future.”

Brown said the CCL is committed to continuing to support unique opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning that has real impact on them and the surrounding community.

The CCL plans to offer the course again next spring. For more information, visit https://ccl.rice.edu/.

Rice course teaches students about philanthropy

A new class offered this semester through Rice University’s Center for Civic Leadership (CCL) taught students about the role of philanthropy in addressing social issues and gave them real experience with awarding grants to nonprofit organizations.

Students pictured with Vida Avery and CCL staff. Photo submitted by CCL.

Thirteen undergraduates and one graduate student enrolled in “Giving to Learn,” a three-credit academic course launched this spring. They studied with Vida Avery, a Houston fundraising professional, to learn about the history and role of philanthropy and to learn to be grant makers themselves.

Throughout the semester, students requested proposals from nonprofit organizations that already had a relationship with the CCL and vetted the organizations and proposals through a rigorous process. After deliberation, the students chose five organizations to receive grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.

Funding for the course was provided by the Philanthropy Lab, a Dallas-based national foundation that supports high-quality programs in philanthropy education. All of the funding went toward the awards distributed by the students.

Rice students present a grant to Agape Development. Photo submitted by CCL.

The Montrose Center, Agape Development, La Raza United, Undies for Everyone and The 5th Ward Enrichment Program received awards at a May 1 event in Farnsworth Pavilion.

The original motivation for pursuing this course and partnership with the Philanthropy Lab was the Rich Family endowment, Circle of Giving and the encouragement of the Rich family for us to implement this type of programming for Rice students,” said Danika Brown, director of curriculum and fellowships for the CCL. “This semester’s course was an inaugural offering, but we plan to continue to find support to continue the course in the future.”

Brown said the CCL is committed to continuing to support unique opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning that has real impact on them and the surrounding community.

The CCL plans to offer the course again next spring. For more information, visit https://ccl.rice.edu/.

Rice course teaches students about philanthropy

A new class offered this semester through Rice University’s Center for Civic Leadership (CCL) taught students about the role of philanthropy in addressing social issues and gave them real experience with awarding grants to nonprofit organizations.

Students pictured with Vida Avery and CCL staff. Photo submitted by CCL.

Thirteen undergraduates and one graduate student enrolled in “Giving to Learn,” a three-credit academic course launched this spring. They studied with Vida Avery, a Houston fundraising professional, to learn about the history and role of philanthropy and to learn to be grant makers themselves.

Throughout the semester, students requested proposals from nonprofit organizations that already had a relationship with the CCL and vetted the organizations and proposals through a rigorous process. After deliberation, the students chose five organizations to receive grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.

Funding for the course was provided by the Philanthropy Lab, a Dallas-based national foundation that supports high-quality programs in philanthropy education. All of the funding went toward the awards distributed by the students.

Rice students present a grant to Agape Development. Photo submitted by CCL.

The Montrose Center, Agape Development, La Raza United, Undies for Everyone and The 5th Ward Enrichment Program received awards at a May 1 event in Farnsworth Pavilion.

The original motivation for pursuing this course and partnership with the Philanthropy Lab was the Rich Family endowment, Circle of Giving and the encouragement of the Rich family for us to implement this type of programming for Rice students,” said Danika Brown, director of curriculum and fellowships for the CCL. “This semester’s course was an inaugural offering, but we plan to continue to find support to continue the course in the future.”

Brown said the CCL is committed to continuing to support unique opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning that has real impact on them and the surrounding community.

The CCL plans to offer the course again next spring. For more information, visit https://ccl.rice.edu/.

Rice course teaches students about philanthropy

A new class offered this semester through Rice University’s Center for Civic Leadership (CCL) taught students about the role of philanthropy in addressing social issues and gave them real experience with awarding grants to nonprofit organizations.

Students pictured with Vida Avery and CCL staff. Photo submitted by CCL.

Thirteen undergraduates and one graduate student enrolled in “Giving to Learn,” a three-credit academic course launched this spring. They studied with Vida Avery, a Houston fundraising professional, to learn about the history and role of philanthropy and to learn to be grant makers themselves.

Throughout the semester, students requested proposals from nonprofit organizations that already had a relationship with the CCL and vetted the organizations and proposals through a rigorous process. After deliberation, the students chose five organizations to receive grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.

Funding for the course was provided by the Philanthropy Lab, a Dallas-based national foundation that supports high-quality programs in philanthropy education. All of the funding went toward the awards distributed by the students.

Rice students present a grant to Agape Development. Photo submitted by CCL.

The Montrose Center, Agape Development, La Raza United, Undies for Everyone and The 5th Ward Enrichment Program received awards at a May 1 event in Farnsworth Pavilion.

The original motivation for pursuing this course and partnership with the Philanthropy Lab was the Rich Family endowment, Circle of Giving and the encouragement of the Rich family for us to implement this type of programming for Rice students,” said Danika Brown, director of curriculum and fellowships for the CCL. “This semester’s course was an inaugural offering, but we plan to continue to find support to continue the course in the future.”

Brown said the CCL is committed to continuing to support unique opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning that has real impact on them and the surrounding community.

The CCL plans to offer the course again next spring. For more information, visit https://ccl.rice.edu/.

Rice course teaches students about philanthropy

A new class offered this semester through Rice University’s Center for Civic Leadership (CCL) taught students about the role of philanthropy in addressing social issues and gave them real experience with awarding grants to nonprofit organizations.

Students pictured with Vida Avery and CCL staff. Photo submitted by CCL.

Thirteen undergraduates and one graduate student enrolled in “Giving to Learn,” a three-credit academic course launched this spring. They studied with Vida Avery, a Houston fundraising professional, to learn about the history and role of philanthropy and to learn to be grant makers themselves.

Throughout the semester, students requested proposals from nonprofit organizations that already had a relationship with the CCL and vetted the organizations and proposals through a rigorous process. After deliberation, the students chose five organizations to receive grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.

Funding for the course was provided by the Philanthropy Lab, a Dallas-based national foundation that supports high-quality programs in philanthropy education. All of the funding went toward the awards distributed by the students.

Rice students present a grant to Agape Development. Photo submitted by CCL.

The Montrose Center, Agape Development, La Raza United, Undies for Everyone and The 5th Ward Enrichment Program received awards at a May 1 event in Farnsworth Pavilion.

The original motivation for pursuing this course and partnership with the Philanthropy Lab was the Rich Family endowment, Circle of Giving and the encouragement of the Rich family for us to implement this type of programming for Rice students,” said Danika Brown, director of curriculum and fellowships for the CCL. “This semester’s course was an inaugural offering, but we plan to continue to find support to continue the course in the future.”

Brown said the CCL is committed to continuing to support unique opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning that has real impact on them and the surrounding community.

The CCL plans to offer the course again next spring. For more information, visit https://ccl.rice.edu/.

Rice course teaches students about philanthropy

A new class offered this semester through Rice University’s Center for Civic Leadership (CCL) taught students about the role of philanthropy in addressing social issues and gave them real experience with awarding grants to nonprofit organizations.

Students pictured with Vida Avery and CCL staff. Photo submitted by CCL.

Thirteen undergraduates and one graduate student enrolled in “Giving to Learn,” a three-credit academic course launched this spring. They studied with Vida Avery, a Houston fundraising professional, to learn about the history and role of philanthropy and to learn to be grant makers themselves.

Throughout the semester, students requested proposals from nonprofit organizations that already had a relationship with the CCL and vetted the organizations and proposals through a rigorous process. After deliberation, the students chose five organizations to receive grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.

Funding for the course was provided by the Philanthropy Lab, a Dallas-based national foundation that supports high-quality programs in philanthropy education. All of the funding went toward the awards distributed by the students.

Rice students present a grant to Agape Development. Photo submitted by CCL.

The Montrose Center, Agape Development, La Raza United, Undies for Everyone and The 5th Ward Enrichment Program received awards at a May 1 event in Farnsworth Pavilion.

The original motivation for pursuing this course and partnership with the Philanthropy Lab was the Rich Family endowment, Circle of Giving and the encouragement of the Rich family for us to implement this type of programming for Rice students,” said Danika Brown, director of curriculum and fellowships for the CCL. “This semester’s course was an inaugural offering, but we plan to continue to find support to continue the course in the future.”

Brown said the CCL is committed to continuing to support unique opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning that has real impact on them and the surrounding community.

The CCL plans to offer the course again next spring. For more information, visit https://ccl.rice.edu/.