Publication of Azusa Pacific Universitys Dead Sea Scrolls to Enhance Biblical Scholarship

Azusa Pacific University announces the long-awaited formal publication of rare Dead Sea Scroll (DSS) manuscripts from its Special Collections library. In 2009, the university acquired five ancient biblical manuscripts for scholarly study and preservation for posterity. A faculty team from APU’s School of Theology has completed its systematic examination, transcription, and analysis of the 2000-year-old manuscripts. The highly anticipated official publication of these rare and fragile antiquities will appear as a volume in the prestigious Princeton Theological Seminary Dead Sea Scrolls Project series in 2017.

The publication was prepared in collaboration with an editorial team at Princeton Theological Seminary headed by James H. Charlesworth, Ph.D., George Collord Professor of New Testament. This volume will join other recently published volumes of Dead Sea Scroll fragments in the Schøyen and Museum of the Bible collections.

“The first volume in the Supplement Volumes of the Princeton’s Dead Sea Scrolls Project is the editio princeps of manuscripts of biblical compositions found among the Dead Sea Scrolls,” said Charlesworth. “These manuscripts were unknown and thus not included in earlier publications of the Dead Sea Scrolls. These scrolls are extremely important because they contain some different readings from those found in our Bibles. Some of these readings help us correct the texts of the Bible. Along with Professor Rietz, my associate editor, and the scholars at APU, I am excited to share these Dead Sea Scrolls with all who are devoted to our Bible and an international, multicultural audience.”

“We look forward to bringing complete information about APU’s ancient biblical manuscripts to the scholarly world,” said lead researcher William Yarchin, Ph.D., the Dean’s Endowed Professor of Biblical Studies in APU’s School of Theology. “Some of these manuscripts contain wording found in no other Hebrew manuscript, and scholars are keen to integrate that information into the existing body of biblical scholarship. It is also important to provide this material to the scholarly world in light of concerns over possible forgeries among scroll fragments that have recently come to light. One of our fragments has been carbon dated as truly ancient. So we are confident, and we fully support all future scientific studies that can help advance research in ancient manuscripts.”

Among the five ancient fragments are portions from the book of Leviticus, the book of Deuteronomy, and the book of Daniel, inscribed at about the time of Christ or within a century earlier. It is possible that the Daniel fragment owned by APU is the world’s oldest existing manuscript of Daniel 5:13-16.

Of the significant findings, „The university’s Deuteronomy 27 fragment features a unique reading in verse 4 that agrees with the Samaritan Torah. This will give scholars new insights into the relationship between Judaism and Samaritanism in antiquity,” said Karen Winslow, Ph.D., professor and chair, biblical and theological studies in the Azusa Pacific Seminary.

The Dead Sea Scrolls have been described as one of the greatest archaeological discoveries ever. They include the oldest biblical manuscripts in existence. Scholars credit the scrolls for increasing knowledge of the origins of Christianity and revolutionizing their understanding of Judaism. Azusa Pacific University’s five Dead Sea Scroll fragments include: 1) portions of Leviticus 10:4-7; 2) portions of Deuteronomy 8:2-5; 3) portions of Deuteronomy 27:4-6; 4) portions of Daniel 5:13-16; and 5) an unidentified fragment. All five fragments are from Qumran Cave 4. In 2010, APU held a public exhibition of these manuscripts along with other biblical artifacts from its Special Collections. Along with its Dead Sea Scroll holdings, APU oversees an archaeological excavation of the biblical site Abel Beth Maacah, a 35-acre tel in the northernmost border of present day Israel. Dig findings include a 3,000-year-old seal depicting ritualistic dance and a silver hoard likely from the late Bronze Age.

Publication of Azusa Pacific Universitys Dead Sea Scrolls to Enhance Biblical Scholarship

Azusa Pacific University announces the long-awaited formal publication of rare Dead Sea Scroll (DSS) manuscripts from its Special Collections library. In 2009, the university acquired five ancient biblical manuscripts for scholarly study and preservation for posterity. A faculty team from APU’s School of Theology has completed its systematic examination, transcription, and analysis of the 2000-year-old manuscripts. The highly anticipated official publication of these rare and fragile antiquities will appear as a volume in the prestigious Princeton Theological Seminary Dead Sea Scrolls Project series in 2017.

The publication was prepared in collaboration with an editorial team at Princeton Theological Seminary headed by James H. Charlesworth, Ph.D., George Collord Professor of New Testament. This volume will join other recently published volumes of Dead Sea Scroll fragments in the Schøyen and Museum of the Bible collections.

“The first volume in the Supplement Volumes of the Princeton’s Dead Sea Scrolls Project is the editio princeps of manuscripts of biblical compositions found among the Dead Sea Scrolls,” said Charlesworth. “These manuscripts were unknown and thus not included in earlier publications of the Dead Sea Scrolls. These scrolls are extremely important because they contain some different readings from those found in our Bibles. Some of these readings help us correct the texts of the Bible. Along with Professor Rietz, my associate editor, and the scholars at APU, I am excited to share these Dead Sea Scrolls with all who are devoted to our Bible and an international, multicultural audience.”

“We look forward to bringing complete information about APU’s ancient biblical manuscripts to the scholarly world,” said lead researcher William Yarchin, Ph.D., the Dean’s Endowed Professor of Biblical Studies in APU’s School of Theology. “Some of these manuscripts contain wording found in no other Hebrew manuscript, and scholars are keen to integrate that information into the existing body of biblical scholarship. It is also important to provide this material to the scholarly world in light of concerns over possible forgeries among scroll fragments that have recently come to light. One of our fragments has been carbon dated as truly ancient. So we are confident, and we fully support all future scientific studies that can help advance research in ancient manuscripts.”

Among the five ancient fragments are portions from the book of Leviticus, the book of Deuteronomy, and the book of Daniel, inscribed at about the time of Christ or within a century earlier. It is possible that the Daniel fragment owned by APU is the world’s oldest existing manuscript of Daniel 5:13-16.

Of the significant findings, „The university’s Deuteronomy 27 fragment features a unique reading in verse 4 that agrees with the Samaritan Torah. This will give scholars new insights into the relationship between Judaism and Samaritanism in antiquity,” said Karen Winslow, Ph.D., professor and chair, biblical and theological studies in the Azusa Pacific Seminary.

The Dead Sea Scrolls have been described as one of the greatest archaeological discoveries ever. They include the oldest biblical manuscripts in existence. Scholars credit the scrolls for increasing knowledge of the origins of Christianity and revolutionizing their understanding of Judaism. Azusa Pacific University’s five Dead Sea Scroll fragments include: 1) portions of Leviticus 10:4-7; 2) portions of Deuteronomy 8:2-5; 3) portions of Deuteronomy 27:4-6; 4) portions of Daniel 5:13-16; and 5) an unidentified fragment. All five fragments are from Qumran Cave 4. In 2010, APU held a public exhibition of these manuscripts along with other biblical artifacts from its Special Collections. Along with its Dead Sea Scroll holdings, APU oversees an archaeological excavation of the biblical site Abel Beth Maacah, a 35-acre tel in the northernmost border of present day Israel. Dig findings include a 3,000-year-old seal depicting ritualistic dance and a silver hoard likely from the late Bronze Age.

NEW BEIT HATFUTSOT EXHIBIT ON NEW YORK FEDERATIONS CENTURY OF IMPACT TO RUN FROM MAY 3-24

TEL AVIV, May 2– UJA-Federation of New York and Beit Hatfutsot-The Museum of the Jewish People, with the American Jewish Historical Society, are collaborating on a new exhibit about the federation’s first 100 years of shaping Jewish life around the world.

The exhibit, UJA-Federation of New York: The First Century, is opening May 3 and will be open to the public for three weeks. An online companion exhibit features interactive elements such as a “Federation City” map detailing all of the UJA partner agencies over 100 years, at: http://www.ajhs.org/uja.

Coinciding with the exhibit is one of UJA-Federation’s biggest Israel missions in its history. More than 300 people from across the New York area are experiencing Israel from April 29-May 5 to celebrate Israel’s independence and the federation’s centennial.

The First Century showcases the lasting impact and achievement of UJA-Federation from 1917-2017. The exhibit features artifacts and photos showcasing UJA’s work throughout major Jewish events of the century including helping to resettle large waves of Jewish immigration to the U.S. in the early 1900s, World War I, the Great Depression, the Holocaust, the creation of the State of Israel, the Six Day War and Yom Kippur War, Ethiopian and Soviet Jewry, the fiscal crisis in New York, 9/11, and Hurricane Sandy, among others.

“Our goal is to tell the story of all Jewish people from around the world,” said Irina Nevzlin, chair of the board of directors of Beit Hatfutsot and president of the Nadav Foundation. “Our task is to give a platform and a home for everybody. It is for that reason that we changed the name from Diaspora Museum to the Museum of all Jewish people. Let’s focus on what unites us and celebrate the future of the Jewish People and Israel’s 69th birthday.”

“This exhibit offers a visual representation of UJA’s vital and far reaching work over the last century,” said Eric S. Goldstein, UJA-Federation CEO. “It provides a stirring illustration of UJA’s impact, and enables us to reflect on how the past informs our future. It also reminds us of the tremendous responsibility we have to ensure our community’s next 100 years.”

The exhibit features a 100-year timeline documenting UJA-Federation’s significant support to social service, medical and Jewish cultural organizations in New York and Israel and to imperiled Jewish communities abroad.

ZOA is Thrilled: Ambassador David Friedman Confirmed as Amb. to Israel

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ZOA’s Morton A. Klein said, “The ZOA sincerely congratulates Amb. David Friedman on this wonderful achievement in a life filled with many achievements. Amb Friedman’s parents Rabbi and Ms. Morris Friedman and Hashem by their side are welling up with pride and joy. This is a great day for America, Israel, the Jewish people and Amb. David Friedman. He will be the most pro-Israel pro-America Ambassador to Israel in history. He is the first U.S. Ambassador to Israel that has a realistic, rational view of the issues affecting all the parties there. We applaud Senators Menendez of NJ and Manchin of West Virginia as Democrats who voted for Amb. Friedman. 


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