Warren named associate VP of development

Kathi Dantley Warren, currently the senior executive director of development for Duke Cancer Institute, has been named associate vice president of development at Rice University, effective July 10.

Kathi Dantley Warren

With more than 17 years of experience at higher education and medical institutions, Warren will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of individual fundraising programs and also oversee various departments within the Office of Development and Alumni Relations, including gift planning, major gifts, school-based fundraising and annual giving.

All of us at Rice are incredibly excited that Kathi will be joining the Development and Alumni Relations team,” said Vice President Darrow Zeidenstein. “Educated as a scientist, Kathi brings incredible smarts and a wealth of development experience from her work at Cornell and Duke, two of the best development programs in the country. I have zero doubt that both faculty and staff will enjoy working with Kathi as we seek to secure resources to enhance Rice’s mission.”

In her development role with one of the original eight comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute, Warren transformed the fundraising program from a yearly $18 million enterprise to a $30 million enterprise and successfully completed a $200 million campaign.

Before joining the Duke Cancer Institute and Duke Health in Durham, N.C., in 2014, Warren served as assistant dean for alumni affairs and development at Cornell University’s College of Engineering, where she created its first alumni affairs and development strategic plan and alumni engagement plan. Over a four-year period she increased annual revenues by 245 percent – from $22.7 million to more than $56 million – and helped achieve the second-best fundraising year in the college’s history. Through philanthropy she also enabled the college to create and endow several new programs, including an engineering leadership program and teaching excellence institute.

“It gave me great joy to see the legacy that this created,” Warren said. “Faculty and students are benefiting from those programs that were the result of a partnership with donors and institutional leadership.”

Warren has an M.A. in cell and molecular biology and microbiology from Duke University and a B.A. in biology from Hampton University. She found herself drawn to the development profession after thinking about how she had been impacted as the recipient of an undergraduate scholarship and graduate fellowship. She learned more about the profession that made that scholarship and fellowship possible and became a development associate at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, College Park, where she worked her way up to associate director of development.

She met a refugee from an African country at a University of Maryland scholarship event for donors and recipients and kept in touch with him. After graduating, the refugee got a job at the United Nations and then returned to his home country to try to assist people there, but none of that would have happened if he had not received the scholarship. “That was hugely impactful,” Warren said. “The scholarship changed not only his life, but the lives of others.” She said experiences like this helped her to find meaning in the development profession. “It’s very rewarding,” she said.

Warren’s career in development includes more than 10 years of leading teams during fundraising campaigns of more than $1 billion. She said the best institutions find a way to blend the scientific tenets of fundraising with “the art of cultivating meaningful, lifelong relationships with an institution,” and Rice’s ability to do that was a key factor in her decision to join the university’s development team.

“Rice has an excellent story to tell and a visionary leader in President David Leebron,” Warren said. She noted that Rice’s prestige as a research institution, its liberal arts programs, its residential college system and its unique landscape in an urban setting are “very compelling and really engender not just investments but partnerships with donors” and can lead to “transformational gifts.”

Originally from Alexandria, Va., Warren said she is excited to come to Rice and to make a home in Texas for her family, which includes her husband, Stephen; her 11-year-old son, Bennett; and Pearl, a Piston terrier who is “the sweetest dog on the planet.” Warren is an avid sports enthusiast who likes to run, lift weights and play basketball with her son. She also enjoys cooking and acrylic painting.

Cree Introduces Next Generation of Groundbreaking RSW LED Street Light Portfolio

DURHAM, N.C. — Cree, Inc. (Nasdaq: CREE) announces the next generation of its groundbreaking Cree® RSW LED Street Light portfolio with the introduction of 2700K, 5000K and 70 Color Rendering Index (CRI) configurations, giving cities and municipalities the ability to meet the full range of lighting preferences for their communities without sacrificing energy savings. The enhanced series includes RSW Small and Medium models that offer warm, inviting light for residential streets and clean, white illumination for roadways. Both deliver improved performance for superior efficacy with uniform and dark-sky friendly LED lighting.

“Cree’s RSW Series enables municipalities to save time, energy and resources with LED street lighting without sacrificing the comfort of residents,” said David Elien, Cree senior vice president and general manager, lighting. “The additional offerings ensure that community officials can address the unique requirements of each roadway application while using less energy and providing enhanced visual comfort without the glare of street lights spilling into neighborhood properties at night.

Municipalities and utilities are under constant pressure to lower operating costs while providing safe and visually appealing light. The expanded series delivers superior efficacy of up to 128 LPW, outperforming High Pressure Sodium (HPS) solutions with up to 70 percent more energy savings and replacing HPS fixtures ranging up to 150W.

Utilizing Cree’s revolutionary WaveMax® Technology, the RSW Series delivers market-leading color quality and efficacy while providing enhanced visual comfort with reduced glare and high color contrast. The RSW Series is also smart-city ready, enabled by a standard NEMA 7-pin.

“With so much discussion around LED street lighting, selecting the right solution can be challenging,” said Elien. “Cree believes choosing better light should be easy, so we have designed the RSW Series to meet the needs of everyone involved in the process: the buyer, the installer, as well as the people who live under them.”

The Cree® RSW Series is backed by Cree’s industry-leading 10-year warranty and available through Cree lighting sales channels throughout the U.S. and Canada. Please visit lighting.cree.com/RSW-Series for more information.

About Cree

Cree is a market-leading innovator of lighting-class LEDs, lighting products and semiconductor products for power and radio frequency (RF) applications. Cree believes in better light experiences and is delivering new innovative LED technology that transforms the way people experience light through high-quality interior and exterior LED lighting solutions.

Cree’s product families include LED lighting systems and bulbs, blue and green LED chips, high-brightness LEDs, lighting-class power LEDs, power-switching devices and RF devices. Cree’s products are driving improvements in applications such as general illumination, electronic signs and signals, power supplies and inverters.

For additional product and Company information, please refer to www.cree.com.

This press release contains forward-looking statements involving risks and uncertainties, both known and unknown, that may cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated. Actual results may differ materially due to a number of factors, including the risk that actual savings and lifetimes will vary from expectations; the risk we may be unable to manufacture these new products with sufficiently low cost to offer them at competitive prices or with acceptable margins; the risk we may encounter delays or other difficulties in ramping up production of our new products; customer acceptance of our new products; the rapid development of new technology and competing products that may impair demand or render Cree’s products obsolete; and other factors discussed in Cree’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 26, 2016, and subsequent filings.

N8 AgriFood hosts collaborative workshop for farming and scientific leaders

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N8 AgriFood has partnered with research and consultancy company ADAS to co-host a workshop for the farming sector and academic scientists to discuss the challenge of increasing crop productivity whilst maintaining soil health.

Farmers, agronomists, farming industries and academics attended the event at the National Agri-Food Innovation Campus.

The workshop, ‘Increasing crop productivity through understanding and improving soil health’, was co-hosted by N8’s chair in soil microbiology Professor Tim Daniell from the University of Sheffield and Dr Pete Berry, Head of Crop Physiology and Principal Scientist at ADAS.

The free-to-attend event, organised by N8 AgriFood, targeted four challenges highlighted by the ADAS-led Yield Enhancement Network (YEN).

YEN, which is a network of farmers, farm industries and applied scientists, has identified several possible bottlenecks in the development of sustainable agriculture. These include manipulating soil biology, improving applied nutrient use efficiency, reducing crop damage and improving soil health.

Professor Tim Daniell from the University of Sheffield’s Department of Animal and Plant Sciences said: “This was a valuable opportunity for members of the farming and academic communities to discuss some of the most pressing issues currently facing the UK’s crop industry and develop projects to fill knowledge gaps restricting sustainable agriculture.

“N8’s AgriFood programme is ideally placed as it combines world-leading crop and soil research and has the capability to contribute towards creating innovative solutions to overcome the challenges posed by YEN.”

Attendees were also provided with updates on current scientific knowledge, practical implications and funding schemes, as the workshop aimed to lead to a number of collaborative grant applications between industrial and academic partners.

Dr Pete Berry of ADAS said: “The UK has plentiful resources for crop production, with potential yields much higher than current levels, yet only modest progress has been made for over 20 years.

“There are several possible mechanisms by which improving soil health could increase crop productivity including increasing water acquisition by crops and increasing the availability of nutrients for crop uptake.

It is likely that there are other mechanisms yet to be identified and it will be important to test ideas for improving crop production at the field scale.” 

Additional information

N8 Research Partnership

The N8 Research Partnership is a collaboration of the eight most research intensive Universities in the North of England: Durham, Lancaster, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, Sheffield and York. It is a not-for-profit organisation funded by the member universities, to promote efficiency, collaboration and innovation.

http://www.n8research.org.uk/

The University of Sheffield

With almost 27,000 of the brightest students from over 140 countries, learning alongside over 1,200 of the best academics from across the globe, the University of Sheffield is one of the world’s leading universities.

A member of the UK’s prestigious Russell Group of leading research-led institutions, Sheffield offers world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines.

Unified by the power of discovery and understanding, staff and students at the university are committed to finding new ways to transform the world we live in.

Sheffield is the only university to feature in The Sunday Times 100 Best Not-For-Profit Organisations to Work For 2017 and was voted number one university in the UK for Student Satisfaction by Times Higher Education in 2014. In the last decade it has won four Queen’s Anniversary Prizes in recognition of the outstanding contribution to the United Kingdom’s intellectual, economic, cultural and social life.

Sheffield has six Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and its alumni go on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence all over the world, making significant contributions in their chosen fields.

Global research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, AstraZeneca, Glaxo SmithKline, Siemens and Airbus, as well as many UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

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N8 AgriFood hosts collaborative workshop for farming and scientific leaders

University of Sheffield's picture

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

N8 AgriFood has partnered with research and consultancy company ADAS to co-host a workshop for the farming sector and academic scientists to discuss the challenge of increasing crop productivity whilst maintaining soil health.

Farmers, agronomists, farming industries and academics attended the event at the National Agri-Food Innovation Campus.

The workshop, ‘Increasing crop productivity through understanding and improving soil health’, was co-hosted by N8’s chair in soil microbiology Professor Tim Daniell from the University of Sheffield and Dr Pete Berry, Head of Crop Physiology and Principal Scientist at ADAS.

The free-to-attend event, organised by N8 AgriFood, targeted four challenges highlighted by the ADAS-led Yield Enhancement Network (YEN).

YEN, which is a network of farmers, farm industries and applied scientists, has identified several possible bottlenecks in the development of sustainable agriculture. These include manipulating soil biology, improving applied nutrient use efficiency, reducing crop damage and improving soil health.

Professor Tim Daniell from the University of Sheffield’s Department of Animal and Plant Sciences said: “This was a valuable opportunity for members of the farming and academic communities to discuss some of the most pressing issues currently facing the UK’s crop industry and develop projects to fill knowledge gaps restricting sustainable agriculture.

“N8’s AgriFood programme is ideally placed as it combines world-leading crop and soil research and has the capability to contribute towards creating innovative solutions to overcome the challenges posed by YEN.”

Attendees were also provided with updates on current scientific knowledge, practical implications and funding schemes, as the workshop aimed to lead to a number of collaborative grant applications between industrial and academic partners.

Dr Pete Berry of ADAS said: “The UK has plentiful resources for crop production, with potential yields much higher than current levels, yet only modest progress has been made for over 20 years.

“There are several possible mechanisms by which improving soil health could increase crop productivity including increasing water acquisition by crops and increasing the availability of nutrients for crop uptake.

It is likely that there are other mechanisms yet to be identified and it will be important to test ideas for improving crop production at the field scale.” 

Additional information

N8 Research Partnership

The N8 Research Partnership is a collaboration of the eight most research intensive Universities in the North of England: Durham, Lancaster, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, Sheffield and York. It is a not-for-profit organisation funded by the member universities, to promote efficiency, collaboration and innovation.

http://www.n8research.org.uk/

The University of Sheffield

With almost 27,000 of the brightest students from over 140 countries, learning alongside over 1,200 of the best academics from across the globe, the University of Sheffield is one of the world’s leading universities.

A member of the UK’s prestigious Russell Group of leading research-led institutions, Sheffield offers world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines.

Unified by the power of discovery and understanding, staff and students at the university are committed to finding new ways to transform the world we live in.

Sheffield is the only university to feature in The Sunday Times 100 Best Not-For-Profit Organisations to Work For 2017 and was voted number one university in the UK for Student Satisfaction by Times Higher Education in 2014. In the last decade it has won four Queen’s Anniversary Prizes in recognition of the outstanding contribution to the United Kingdom’s intellectual, economic, cultural and social life.

Sheffield has six Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and its alumni go on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence all over the world, making significant contributions in their chosen fields.

Global research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, AstraZeneca, Glaxo SmithKline, Siemens and Airbus, as well as many UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

Copy this html code to your website/blog to embed this press release.

Fantastic eggs and where to find them

Carved ostrich egg from Isis Tomb, Vulci (Etruria), BM1850, 0227.6. Photo by T. Hodos, by permission of Trustees of the British Museum

Ostrich eggshell fragment ready to be analysed under the Scanning Electron Microscope. Photo by A. Fletcher, by permission of Trustees of the British Museum

Carved and painted ostrich egg showing hoplites, BM1850, 0227.9. Copyright Trustees of the British Museum

Archaeologists and scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Durham and the British Museum are using cutting edge technology to crack a conundrum surrounding the ancient trade in ostrich eggs.

Decorated ostrich eggs were traded as luxury items from the Middle East to the Western Mediterranean during the Iron Age (1200-300 BC).

Several beautiful examples – both intact and in fragments – have been part of the British Museum’s collection since the nineteenth century.

The eggs were engraved, painted and occasionally embellished with ivory, precious metals and faience fittings. They were found in elite contexts from Spain to Iraq.

The research team wants to find out where the eggs were laid and whether the birds laying them were wild or captive.

Dr Tamar Hodos, Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Bristol’s Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, said: „Apart from noting their presence as unusual vessels in funerary and celebratory settings, surprisingly little is known about where they actually come from or who decorated them, much less how they circulated.

Using the British Museum’s collection of ostrich eggs from the Mediterranean and Middle East, isotopic analyses of strontium, oxygen and carbon in the eggshells are being used to investigate where the eggs were laid and whether the ostriches were captive or wild, by detecting what and where the mother was eating and drinking during ovulation.

Detailed study of the eggshells’ intricate decoration via scanning electron microscopy will allow the research team to compare carving techniques, helping them understand how they were created.

Dr Alexandra Fletcher, Curator in the Middle East Department at the British Museum, said: „We really want to find out more about how this trade worked. Were eggs gathered from nests in the wild, given that this was a potentially dangerous activity? Or is it possible that ostriches were kept in captivity to ensure the luxury trade had a supply of eggs readily available?”

The question of captivity is an important one. Images on objects such as cylinder seals from the same period show ostriches as dangerous and fierce creatures.

One has an ancient king strangling an ostrich while the bird kicks him in the stomach, for example. It seems, however, that some members of these ancient societies were adept at catching and handling dangerous beasts.

The famous Assyrian reliefs at the British Museum show that royal ‚lion hunts’ were staged affairs. Captured lions were released from cages directly into the path of their hunters. Could the ostriches also have been captive creatures?

It is hoped that the information held in the ostrich eggshells themselves will tell us more about how they were obtained, decorated and traded, which will in turn reveal more about both the people who supplied these luxury goods and those who coveted them. 

Founded in 1753, the British Museum was the first national public museum in the world. From the outset it was a museum of the world, for the world, and this idea still lies at the heart of the Museum’s mission today. The collection tells the stories of cultures across the world, from the dawn of human history, over two million years ago, to the present.

Objects range from the earliest tools made by humans and treasures from the ancient world to more recent acquisitions from Africa, Oceania and the Americas, the Middle East, Asia and Europe, as well as the national collections of prints and drawings, and coins and medals. In addition to work in London, the Museum takes part in an extensive programme of loans and tours, both across the UK and throughout the world. 

Highest calibre Scottish Rowing group bound for GB Rowing Team trials

Poster: April 10, 2017

Three world champions are amongst a Scottish Rowing supported group of athletes invited to this week’s GB Rowing Team Senior & Under 23 trials (14-16 April) at Caversham, hoping to put down strong performances to help secure places on international teams this summer.

The 10 athletes trialling at the venue near Reading are Maddie Arlett (Selkirk, Edinburgh Uni BC), Josh Armstrong (Glasgow, Edinburgh Uni BC), Fiona Bell (Kilmacolm, Aberdeen Uni BC), Jack Burns (Glasgow, Clydesdale ARC), Matt Curtis (Durham, Edinburgh Uni BC), Gavin Horsburgh (Lochwinnoch, Edinburgh Uni BC), Calum Irvine (Aviemore, Edinburgh Uni BC), Graham Ord (Hamilton, Edinburgh Uni BC), James Temple (Kew, Edinburgh Uni BC) and Oli Wilkes (Matlock, Edinburgh Uni BC).

The trials process began last November and a hard winter’s training has seen progress across the board both on and off the water for this group which include six GB internationals.

Lochwinnoch’s Gavin Horsburgh, who achieved the rare sporting crown of winning back to back world titles in 2015 at under 18 level, then a year later in the under 23 age group with Matt Curtis as part of the lightweight men’s quad, struck good form in February and delivered his best trial yet.

“I managed to finish pretty high up at fourth overall in the 5k,” said Horsburgh, one of eight athletes representing Edinburgh University at these trials, who is targeting a seat in the under 23 lightweight team.  “I was up there fighting it out with the seniors and I was able to take a couple of senior scalps.
 
“So I’m going to keep upping my game as I move into this 2k season.”

For Fiona Bell, Jack Burns and Oli Wilkes this is the first time they have reached this stage of the trials process.

“Trials have been a bit of a whirlwind,” explained the 22-year-old Bell, a final year student at Aberdeen University.  “At the first stage I wasn’t expecting a top ten in the under 23 event so I was really happy to do so.

Then I surprised myself on the erg.  I have taken off around 15 seconds on my 2k time in the last few months which is quite a chunk.

For the first time ever the athletes, from programmes across Scotland, will travel to the trials together as one team supported by Scottish Rowing.  

Winning Students is providing financial backing to the group whilst the sportscotland institute of sport is supplying support through an exercise physiologist and physiotherapist.

“It’s great we have got a physio and physiologist coming down to support us,” said Glasgow’s Josh Armstrong, the under 18 World Champion in 2015 who has moved up an age group to under 23s this season.

“It’s an intensive week and a half so it’s great to have their support if we need it.  It’s ideal for making sure we are in top condition for the races and to know we have not left any stone unturned.”

Said Lee Boucher, Scottish Rowing’s Director of Performance Operations:  “We strongly believe this is the highest calibre, best prepared group of athletes from Scotland ever to attend this stage of the GB Rowing Team trialling process.

“The group includes six internationals, four of whom have either won gold or medalled at a world championships.

“There are some outstanding rowing programmes in Scotland at the moment, underpinned by high quality coaching and support services and we are optimistic for another successful summer for Scottish athletes on the world stage as part of the GB Rowing Team.

“Thank you to our partners at the sportscotland institute of sport and Winning Students who are playing a vital part in supporting our world class rowing programme in Scotland.”

A further 10 English-based Scottish athletes will also contest this week’s trials.  Karen Bennett (Edinburgh, Leander Club), who won a historic silver with the women’s eight at the Rio 2016 Games, heads an impressive list of Cameron Buchan (Dunipace, Leander Club), Callum McBrierty (Edinburgh, Leander Club), Katherine Douglas (Edinburgh, Leander Club), Robyn Hart-Winks (Kirriemuir, University of London BC), Harry Leask (Edinburgh, Leander Club), Lewis Moran (Glasgow, Molesey BC), Sam Scrimgeour (Kirriemuir, Molesey BC), James Stevenson (Edinburgh, Newcastle University BC) and Melissa Wilson (Edinburgh, Cambridge Uni Women’s BC).