Obamacare support: When polls mention repeal it seals the deal

ITHACA, N.Y. – With the U.S. Senate set to take up debate on a new health care bill, Cornell researchers asked a simple question: Does the American public want former President Obama’s health care law repealed and replaced? It depends on how you ask the question.

The researchers analyzed hundreds of national opinion polls from March 2010, when Obama signed the Affordable Care Act, through the recent presidential election. They wanted to know whether different wording in survey questions would predict support for “Obamacare.

Support for Obamacare is significantly higher – by about 9 percentage points – when the survey question explicitly mentions “repeal” or “repeal or replace” as an option, they found. The study was published May 4 in Health Communication.

“Given that ‘repeal and replace’ really has been the mantra of Republican lawmakers, it’s interesting that polls mentioning that term don’t show higher support for getting rid of the law. It actually seems to put people in a mindset where they support the existing law even more,” said co-author Jonathon Schuldt, assistant professor of communication at Cornell University.

Co-author Jeff Niederdeppe, associate professor of communication at Cornell, and his colleagues hypothesize that loss aversion, a well-researched concept in economics and psychology, may account for the law’s greater support on questions that include “repeal” or “repeal and replace.” That is, people generally want to avoid a loss more than they want an equivalent gain, he said.

“When people have a law that has expanded health care options for tens of millions in the U.S., talking about taking it away seems to, if anything, increase people’s support for it,” Niederdeppe said.

The research also points out that survey questions, depending on the polling organization, can take radically different forms, Schuldt said.

As every good survey researcher knows, there’s no right way to ask a question, Schuldt said. One must critically engage with the way survey questions are asked and the organization that’s asking them to get a clearer understanding of public sentiment. “The wording of surveys matters more than we think.”

Cornell University has television, ISDN and dedicated Skype/Google+ Hangout studios available for media interviews. For more information, see this Cornell Chronicle story.

Warren named associate VP of development

Kathi Dantley Warren, currently the senior executive director of development for Duke Cancer Institute, has been named associate vice president of development at Rice University, effective July 10.

Kathi Dantley Warren

With more than 17 years of experience at higher education and medical institutions, Warren will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of individual fundraising programs and also oversee various departments within the Office of Development and Alumni Relations, including gift planning, major gifts, school-based fundraising and annual giving.

All of us at Rice are incredibly excited that Kathi will be joining the Development and Alumni Relations team,” said Vice President Darrow Zeidenstein. “Educated as a scientist, Kathi brings incredible smarts and a wealth of development experience from her work at Cornell and Duke, two of the best development programs in the country. I have zero doubt that both faculty and staff will enjoy working with Kathi as we seek to secure resources to enhance Rice’s mission.”

In her development role with one of the original eight comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute, Warren transformed the fundraising program from a yearly $18 million enterprise to a $30 million enterprise and successfully completed a $200 million campaign.

Before joining the Duke Cancer Institute and Duke Health in Durham, N.C., in 2014, Warren served as assistant dean for alumni affairs and development at Cornell University’s College of Engineering, where she created its first alumni affairs and development strategic plan and alumni engagement plan. Over a four-year period she increased annual revenues by 245 percent – from $22.7 million to more than $56 million – and helped achieve the second-best fundraising year in the college’s history. Through philanthropy she also enabled the college to create and endow several new programs, including an engineering leadership program and teaching excellence institute.

“It gave me great joy to see the legacy that this created,” Warren said. “Faculty and students are benefiting from those programs that were the result of a partnership with donors and institutional leadership.”

Warren has an M.A. in cell and molecular biology and microbiology from Duke University and a B.A. in biology from Hampton University. She found herself drawn to the development profession after thinking about how she had been impacted as the recipient of an undergraduate scholarship and graduate fellowship. She learned more about the profession that made that scholarship and fellowship possible and became a development associate at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, College Park, where she worked her way up to associate director of development.

She met a refugee from an African country at a University of Maryland scholarship event for donors and recipients and kept in touch with him. After graduating, the refugee got a job at the United Nations and then returned to his home country to try to assist people there, but none of that would have happened if he had not received the scholarship. “That was hugely impactful,” Warren said. “The scholarship changed not only his life, but the lives of others.” She said experiences like this helped her to find meaning in the development profession. “It’s very rewarding,” she said.

Warren’s career in development includes more than 10 years of leading teams during fundraising campaigns of more than $1 billion. She said the best institutions find a way to blend the scientific tenets of fundraising with “the art of cultivating meaningful, lifelong relationships with an institution,” and Rice’s ability to do that was a key factor in her decision to join the university’s development team.

“Rice has an excellent story to tell and a visionary leader in President David Leebron,” Warren said. She noted that Rice’s prestige as a research institution, its liberal arts programs, its residential college system and its unique landscape in an urban setting are “very compelling and really engender not just investments but partnerships with donors” and can lead to “transformational gifts.”

Originally from Alexandria, Va., Warren said she is excited to come to Rice and to make a home in Texas for her family, which includes her husband, Stephen; her 11-year-old son, Bennett; and Pearl, a Piston terrier who is “the sweetest dog on the planet.” Warren is an avid sports enthusiast who likes to run, lift weights and play basketball with her son. She also enjoys cooking and acrylic painting.

Richard Feldman looks back on a decade as dean

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Dean of the College Richard Feldman will step down as dean at the end of this academic year. (University photo / Jim Mandelaro)

Richard Feldman arrived on the River Campus as an assistant professor of philosophy in 1975. He eventually became a professor and chair of the department, and in 2006 he was named interim Dean of the College when longtime dean William Scott Green left to become vice provost and dean of undergraduate education at the University of Miami.

Feldman was appointed dean in 2007, and this past January, he announced he was stepping down at the end of the academic year. He’ll take a year’s sabbatical before returning to the University in 2018 as a philosophy professor.

“It’s hard for me to imagine the College without Rich Feldman as dean,” says Dean of Students Matthew Burns, who has worked with Feldman for 15 years. “While he leaves the College in a stronger place than ever, and has done as much as any one person could to ensure our future success, it seems surreal to imagine the place without him. He’s known for his great mind, his ethical leadership, and his sense of humility despite his tremendous abilities. It’s been one of the greatest privileges of my career to work with him.”

Beth Olivares, dean for diversity initiatives, says Feldman will leave a lasting mark at the College.

A couple of colleagues noted that Rich models the best behaviors of the best leaders: he teaches by example as much as anything,” Olivares says. “I suspect there isn’t a corner of the College that hasn’t been changed for the better because of Rich’s leadership and attention to detail.”

Outgoing Students’ Association president Vito Martino ’17 says Feldman’s contributions to undergraduates have been “priceless.”

Feldman received his bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in 1970 and his doctoral degree in philosophy from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1975. He lives in Rochester with Andrea, his wife of 42 years. Their daughter, Erica, lives in Philadelphia with her husband and two children.

How has the campus most dramatically changed over the four decades since you arrived?

One of the biggest changes is our connection to the Rochester community. When I started here, we were like an island, with the river and the cemetery surrounding the campus. There was very little connection to the Rochester community. The fact that students were in Rochester, New York, made very little difference to their experience. Now, with the growth of College Town, our academic engagement with the community, volunteering and internships, we’re a part of the community in a way we never were, unrecognizable from when I came here.

Why is it important for students to be part of the Rochester community?

Education beyond the classroom has a real impact on students’ lives. That kind of hands-on experience, interacting with the community, adds enormously to what they’re able to learn. Extending the classroom beyond the campus extends what students have the opportunity to learn about. Several years ago, people started to think online education might replace campus-based education. And it made me think, well, why are they here? What’s the value of them being here? There were three things: the ability to interact with one another on campus, the ability to interact directly with the faculty in research, and the ability to expand their education by interacting with the community. All help to enrich their education.

Richard Feldman with his wife, Andrea, at a celebration naming the new ballroom in the Frederick Douglass Building for him. (University photo / J. Adam Fenster)

How have the students changed?

One way the student body has changed is the demographics. We’re more diverse in every way you can imagine: internationally, different racial groups, different religions. That’s one of our greatest strengths, provided we take advantage of it and students interact with one another and learn from one another. The other change that’s most notable has to do with technology and how it has changed the world. When I got here, there weren’t computers. You had to go to the library and read your books. Today’s students grew up with computers. It’s part of their lives. The way they interact with each other and the faculty and staff is so different.

You helped create and implement the Rochester Curriculum, which allows undergraduates to build a program of study based on their strengths and interests. Can you take us back to when you and others were fleshing it out and describe the philosophy behind it?

The curriculum committee meetings in the mid-1990s went like this: the standard model for the curriculum was to have a half-dozen categories of things and everyone has to do one of these and two of those. We thought it fostered a kind of superficiality, where you did an introductory thing here and there, checking off a list. Students would ask, “What do I have to do to be done with this?” Faculty too often found themselves teaching students who didn’t want to be there.  Students were doing things they were forced to do. They weren’t engaged and weren’t learning enough. We also thought there was no convincing rationale for what set of things students were required to take. We could agree that it would be nice if they knew a little chemistry, and some biology, and some economics, and so on, for every discipline. But we couldn’t require some of everything. Our conclusion was that we should pick just a few broad categories and let students choose what they’re interested in. It will add breadth to their education, but they’ll own it in a different kind of way. It seems to me it has worked extremely well. Very few universities have something like this, and nobody I know has exactly this.

You placed a great emphasis on internships and study abroad programs. What’s the impact of this?

To prepare students for success in the world after they graduate. Employers say they want some kind of disciplinary expertise, but they also want people who are problem solvers and are able to communicate and interact with others and work in teams. In a great many cases, companies are established worldwide. Students gain those types of experiences through internships and studying abroad. In addition, studying abroad provides students with an opportunity to engage deeply with another culture, thereby building skills that will benefit them in the globally connected world into which they will graduate.

Vice President and Senior Advisor to the President Paul Burgett, left, shares a laugh with Richard Feldman at the 2013 convocation ceremony. (University photo / J. Adam Fenster)

You played a lead role in planning the renovation of the Frederick Douglass Building, now Douglass Commons, as a student hub. Why was it important to have this revitalized building next to Wilson Commons, which opened the year after you arrived?

It connects to the point about the diversity of the campus. It’s effective if students interact with each other, and that’s increasingly a function of the kinds of spaces we offer. One impact of technology is that it makes it very easy to sit in your room and stare at a screen. That makes community spaces more important. A space like Douglass fosters accidental connections among students who might otherwise not interact with one another. The importance of community spaces like Douglass and the library have grown over time. It’s what Douglass is all about. Before Wilson Commons, the student hub was Todd Union, and there was a guy in the basement making hamburgers (where the post office is now). Wilson Commons is a beautiful building, and it’s played a great role on campus. But if you think about the purpose of a student center—a place where students can meet and events can happen—Wilson Commons is a big open space. There’s not a lot of floor space. It failed to serve that purpose as well as it might. Douglass fixes that, and we’re trying to link the two buildings as much as we can and think of them as a Campus Center. Together they make it all work.

You served as co-chair on the Presidential Commission on Race and Diversity. How do you view the racial climate on campus?

Overall, there’s a great deal of respect, acceptance and interaction among students. But at times there are problems. There are circumstances in which minority students and various groups of students feel excluded and unwelcome. We work very hard to try to correct that, but things happen that are less than ideal. I’ve been pleased by some things that have happened since the commission was started. The We’re Better Than That anti-racism campaign has brought a good number of faculty, staff, and students together. There is a lot of good-will in the campus community. But we need to continue to work to help people talk about difficult things in thoughtful and respectful ways. We can do always better, but the direction is right.

What other challenges remain for the College?

There are different kinds of challenges. From the administration’s perspective, there are challenges about continuing to attract and enroll the strongest students, issues about affordability of college and being able to address them. The structure of the curriculum, the offerings, it’s never a finished product. You’re always adapting. Years ago, you went to college, you studied something and got a degree, and had confidence that something would work out. We have to be more intentional now in understanding what skills our students need and keep getting better about making sure our education equips students for the world they’re entering.

To mark the first day of classes in September 2014, Richard Feldman joins Dean of River Campus Libraries Mary Ann Mavrinac (left) and students Jon Macoskey and James Frauen (left to right) in ringing a replica of the bell used by Martin Brewer Anderson, the university’s first president, to signal class changes on Eastman Quadrangle. (University photo / J. Adam Fenster)

If you never moved to higher education, what would you be doing today?
I’ve thought about that. It’s hard to know. My guess is I would have gone into law.

When did you know you wanted to be a professor?

Not until late in college. I started college as an engineer. I did well in math and science in high school, and people said ‘You’re an engineer.’ I didn’t know what engineering was, but I applied to engineering schools. I got in and pretty quickly learned I didn’t want to do that. I switched to physics for awhile and then went into political science. As a junior, I took a philosophy course, because my older brother at that point was finishing grad school in philosophy and I wanted to know what he was doing. I thought it was the hardest and most interesting thing I’d ever encountered. So I decided to make it my major, but then I went through this “Is it cool to do what my brother does?” It was senior year in college that I really decided philosophy was what I wanted, and I went on to grad school.

Being the dean of a college must be stressful. What are your stress relievers?

I like to run, I like to bike, my wife and I enjoy movies . . . I get together with friends. Those are the main things. One hobby I have is growing orchids. I intend to get more involved with that. As a kid, I played bridge a lot. I may get back to that.

You were named the Romanell-Phi Beta Kappa Professor in Philosophy for 2017-18 for your contributions to the field. You’ll present three lectures this fall that are open to the public. What will you be talking about?

The lectures will broadly be about topics on rational argument and public discourse. Kind of an interesting topic to think about these days.

Richard Feldman performing the ‘cannon solo’ in a performance of the 1812 Overture to mark the end of classes in May 2017. (University photo / J. Adam Fenster)

Are you looking forward to returning to the faculty in 2018?

I am. The pace and style of the dean’s world is very different from the faculty. I’ve absolutely loved this job. It’s been enormously gratifying, rewarding, and exciting. The pace of it is intense. I’m looking forward to  a change, but I know I’m going to miss being dean.

Will you do any traveling during your year away?

Yes, I have a philosophy conference and talks in Italy, a week-long seminar in Cologne, Germany, and my wife and I plan to spend a month in Philadelphia where our grandchildren and their parents live. And we’re thinking about a trip to Cuba.

What will you miss most about being dean?

I think the interactions with the students, my colleagues in the dean’s office, and the college staff I work closely with. The thing I’ve come to appreciate as dean in a way I didn’t before is how much all the people on the college staff contribute to the education of our students to make it all work. All the things beyond the classroom that contribute to the students’ experience have really made an impression on me.

Finally, what’s your proudest achievement as dean?

Early on in my time as dean, we looked at the graduation rates of our students. They weren’t what we wanted them to be, and we set out to find out why, and what we could do to improve them. They’ve gone up notably, and I’m delighted by that. Everything that happens on campus contributes to the success of students: the classes, co-curricular programs, the buildings. The improvement is a function of lots and lots of different things.

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Making Ideas Happen at CompTIA ChannelCon 2017

Tech entrepreneur, author and investor Scott Belsky announced as keynote speaker
 

Downers Grove, Ill. – Taking great ideas and turning them into reality will be the focus of the keynote speech at ChannelCon 2017, the information technology (IT) channel’s premier education, networking and partnering event.

CompTIA, the world’s leading technology association, announced today that tech entrepreneur, author and investor Scott Belsky will deliver keynote remarks at ChannelCon 2017. The conference is scheduled for July 31 through August 2 in Austin, Texas.

Belsky is the co-creator of Behance, an online media portfolio platform for creative professionals that was acquired by Adobe in 2012. He’s also been an early-stage investor and advisor to Uber, Warby Parker, Pinterest, Periscope, sweetgreen, and other companies.

“Scott Belsky and his team at Behance identified a series of best practices that some of the world’s most productive and creative people and teams rely on to turn ideas into projects and to push projects to completion,” said Kelly Ricker, executive vice president, events and education, CompTIA.

“His message that great ideas only see the light of day when creative people and teams get organized, harness the forces of community and become better leaders is one that’s certain to resonate with ChannelCon attendees,” she added.

Belsky is the author of the national bestselling book “Making Ideas Happen” (Penguin Books, April 2010). He serves on the advisory board of Cornell University’s Entrepreneurship Program and is a member of the board of trustees for the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. He attended Cornell University as an undergraduate and received his MBA from Harvard Business School.

ChannelCon brings together executives and thought-leaders from across the technology industry for three days of educational sessions, panels, keynotes, and networking opportunities on the most important topics and trends impacting the industry.

To register for ChannelCon 2017 or for more information about the conference visit https://www.comptia.org/channelcon/register-and-plan.

CompTIA: Building the Foundation for Technology’s Future

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is the world’s leading technology association, with approximately 2,000 member companies, 3,000 academic and training partners, over 100,000 registered users and more than two million IT certifications issued. CompTIA’s unparalleled range of programs foster workforce skills development and generate critical knowledge and insight – building the foundation for technology’s future. Visit CompTIA online, , LinkedIn and to learn more. 

Did you catch that? Robots speed of light communication could protect you from danger

Media Note: To view and download a “model” image of the technology, go to https://cornell.box.com/v/robotsurveillance.

 

ITHACA, N.Y. – Cornell University researchers are developing a system to enable teams of robots to share information as they move around, and if necessary, interpret what they see. This would allow the robots to conduct surveillance as a single entity with many eyes. Beyond surveillance, the new technology could enable teams of robots to relieve humans of dangerous jobs such as disposing of landmines, cleaning up after a nuclear meltdown or surveying the damage after a flood or hurricane.

“Once you have robots that cooperate, you can do all sorts of things,” said Kilian Weinberger, associate professor of computer science, who is collaborating on the project with Silvia Ferrari, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and Mark Campbell, professor of mechanical engineering.

Their work, “Convolutional-Features Analysis and Control for Mobile Visual Scene Perception,” is supported by a four-year, $1.7 million grant from the U.S. Office of Naval Research.

The researchers will call on their extensive experience with computer vision to match and combine images of the same area from several cameras, identify objects and track objects and people from place to place. The work will require groundbreaking research because most prior work in the field has focused on analyzing images from just a single camera as it moves around. The new system will fuse information from fixed cameras, mobile observers and outside sources.

The mobile observers might include autonomous aircraft and ground vehicles and perhaps humanoid robots wandering through a crowd. They will send their images to a central control unit, which might also have access to other cameras looking at the region of interest, as well as access to the internet for help in labeling what it sees. What make of car is that? How do you open this container? Identify this person.

Knowing the context of a scene, robot observers may detect suspicious actors and activities that might otherwise go unnoticed. A person running may be a common occurrence on a college campus but may require further scrutiny in a secured area.

Researchers plan early tests on the Cornell campus, using research robots to “surveil” crowded areas while drawing on an overview from existing webcams. This work might lead to incorporating the new technology into campus security.

In addition to the ONR grant, previous work by the researchers has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy.

For more information:

Daryl Lovell

office: 607-254-4799

cell: 607-592-3925
dal296@cornell.edu

 

Cornell University has television, ISDN and dedicated Skype/Google+ Hangout studios available for media interviews. For additional information, see this Cornell Chronicle story.

Biochar provides high-definition electron pathways in soil

ITHACA, N.Y. – All plants need electrons to aid biological and chemical tasks. Cornell University scientists have discovered a new high-definition system that allows electrons to travel through soil farther and more efficiently than previously thought.

“Microorganisms need electrons for everything they do. If they consume nutrients or spew out methane or expel carbon dioxide – for any living, biological process – they need electrons,” said Tianran Sun, postdoctoral researcher in soil and crop sciences and lead author of the paper that appears March 31 in Nature Communications.

Like large volumes of electricity that flow from Niagara Falls throughout upstate New York, electrons convey through soil via carbon. “We weren’t aware of this high-definition soil distribution system transporting electrons from far away. It’s not kilometers, it’s not meters, but centimeter distances that matter in soil,” said Johannes Lehmann, professor of soil science.

In fact, amending the soil with pyrogenic carbon – known as biochar – brings high definition to the electron network. In turn, the electrons spur conductive networks and growth, said Sun.

“Previously we thought there were only low-performing electron pathways in the soil – and now we’ve learned the electrons are channeled through soil very efficiently in a high-performing way,” said Lehmann.

Lehmann and the members of his laboratory had struggled to understand why microorganisms thrived in the presence of biochar. The group removed soil phosphorus, making the environment inhospitable. They ruled out water and nutrients. They discarded the use of biochar as a food source because microorganisms cannot consume much of it. Through Sun’s background in environmental chemistry, the scientists found that microorganisms may be drawn to electrons that the biochar can transport.

These results will lead to a better understanding of microbial responses in soil and microbial metabolism, including long-term effects on greenhouse gas emissions,” Sun said.

The National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture funded this research.

 

Cornell University has television, ISDN and dedicated Skype/Google+ Hangout studios available for media interviews. For additional information, see this Cornell Chronicle story.

When human illness rises, the environment suffers, too

Fishermen on Lake Victoria (Photo by Kathryn Fiorella)

A toxic environment is known to create health problems for people, but sick people can also create health problems for the environment. Around Kenya’s Lake Victoria, a fishing community where locals battle high rates of disease and a depleted fish stock, scientists found that human illness exacerbates unsustainable fishing practices.

The study challenges the long-held assumption in environmental research that human disease provides a natural check to environmental exploitation and demonstrates a new way that poor human health may harm the environment. The study suggests that quality healthcare could have benefits beyond human populations and help people manage their environment and the sustainability of those resources.

“Studies have suggested people will spend less time on their livelihoods when they are sick, but we didn’t see that trend in our study. Instead, we saw a shift toward more destructive fishing methods when people were ill,” said Kathryn Fiorella, the lead author of the study and a postdoctoral scholar at Cornell University. Fiorella was a doctoral student at Berkeley during the study, working in the lab of professor Justin Brashares.

The study will be published the week of April 3 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study was supported by funding from the National Science Foundation.

Kathryn Fiorella

Understanding the links between human and environmental health is critical for the millions who cope with recurrent illness and rely directly on natural resources for sustenance.

“Healthy people, it turns out, are better for the environment,” said Richard Yuretich, program officer for the National Science Foundation’s Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems Program, which funded the research. “When you feel well, you can plan the tasks you need to accomplish more carefully. But when you’re sick, you often just want to get things done fast, with the result that you may be more wasteful. This project illustrates the complex relationships we have with the world around us. Investigating these links is the principal aim of NSF’s Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems Program.”

Added Brashares: “We’re focused on identifying and illuminating these connections between a changing environment and its potential impacts on human economies, health and social systems,”

To study these connections, Fiorella spent three months of each year of her graduate studies at Lake Victoria, a place where health and the environment are intertwined in complex ways and have been for decades.

Lake Victoria transformed after British colonists introduced Nile perch, a predatory fish, to the lake in the 1960s to support commercial fishing. Nile perch quickly dominated the lake and caused the extinction of hundreds of native cichlid species. During the 1980s and 1990s, commercial fishing grew around the lake and Nile perch started to decline, so regulations were enacted to save the fishery. During the same time, the HIV epidemic was spreading throughout East Africa. As Lake Victoria’s fishing community grew sicker, the environmental exploitation of the fishery worsened.

To explore how illness was altering fishing practices, the researchers tracked 303 households living on Lake Victoria. The households were interviewed four different times over a year. The researchers collected data about household health and fishing habits and looked for trends during times of sickness and good health.

Among active fishers, the study found limited evidence that illness reduced fishing effort. Instead, ill fishers shifted the methods they used. When ill, fishers were more likely to use methods that were illegal, destructive and concentrated near the shoreline, but required less travel and energy, the study found. Ill fishers were also less likely to use legal methods that are physically demanding, require travel to deep waters and are considered more sustainable.

“When people are chronically ill, they have different outlooks on the future,” Brashares said. “That different outlook means that they increasingly rely on unsustainable methods because they’re focused on short-term gain.”

Bill Nye Joins March for Science as Honorary Co-chair, Speaker

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The Planetary Society Joins as Partner Organization

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

03/30/2017

CONTACT:

Erin Greeson

Email:

Phone: +1-626-793-5100

Pasadena, CA (30 March 2017) — The Planetary Society today announced that CEO Bill Nye (The Science Guy®) will join the global March for Science as a speaker and honorary Co-chair. The organization, the world’s largest non-governmental space interest group, announced its official partner role. Nye’s participation will occur at the Washington, D.C. event, and The Planetary Society will participate globally as the March for Science unfolds in approximately 400 locations around the world.

Bill Nye issued a statement about The Planetary Society’s participation (for the full statement, read Nye’s blog).

Nye described the March for Science as consistent with The Planetary Society’s values.

“Science is universal.” said Nye. “Space exploration brings out the best in us.”

We march to inspire unity. When we explore the cosmos, we come together and accomplish extraordinary things. Space science brings people of all walks of life together to solve problems and experience the unparalleled awe of exploration. Everyone – regardless of race, gender, nationality, creed or ability –  is welcome in our journey to advance space science.

“We march to advocate for space,” Nye added. “There’s a new movement for space exploration.”

Nye said that March for Science participation is consistent with Planetary Society cofounders’ legacy.

“Carl Sagan, my astronomy professor at Cornell University, cofounded The Planetary Society. He was a space science champion, advocate and communicator. He inspired the world to experience space science and delight in discoveries: achieved and within reach. His legacy lives on, through us: through you.”

Bill Nye’s full statement is published on his blog.

Omaze launched an official t-shirt campaign to benefit The Planetary Society during the March for Science and onward. The “Science is Universal” shirt is part of an ongoing movement for science literacy and space advocacy. The shirt is available at: http://omaze.com/bill

The Planetary Society shared participation details, including onsite and remote opportunities.

Citizens interested in marching with The Planetary Society can find details on the event page: http://planetary.org/march

Remote participation opportunities include a hashtag campaign #ScienceIsUniversal, which encourages science supporters around the world to submit photos in solidarity for science.

More information about The Planetary Society’s participation will be announced as March for Science program details are finalized.

About

The Planetary Society: The Planetary Society has inspired millions of people to explore other worlds and seek other life. With the mission to empower the world’s citizens to advance space science and exploration, its international membership makes the non-governmental Planetary Society the largest space interest group in the world. Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded The Planetary Society in 1980. Bill Nye, a longtime member of The Planetary Society’s Board, serves as CEO. www.planetary.org

March for Science, Mission: The March for Science champions robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good and for political leaders and policy makers to enact evidence based policies in the public interest. www.marchforscience.com

Media Resources

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About The Planetary Society

The Planetary Society has inspired millions of people to explore other worlds and seek other life. With the mission to empower the world’s citizens to advance space science and exploration, its international membership makes the non-governmental Planetary Society the largest space interest group in the world. Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded The Planetary Society in 1980. Bill Nye, a longtime member of The Planetary Society’s Board, serves as CEO.

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Bill Nye Joins March for Science as Honorary Co-chair, Speaker

The Planetary Society's picture

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

The Planetary Society Joins as Partner Organization

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

03/30/2017

CONTACT:

Erin Greeson

Email:

Phone: +1-626-793-5100

Pasadena, CA (30 March 2017) — The Planetary Society today announced that CEO Bill Nye (The Science Guy®) will join the global March for Science as a speaker and honorary Co-chair. The organization, the world’s largest non-governmental space interest group, announced its official partner role. Nye’s participation will occur at the Washington, D.C. event, and The Planetary Society will participate globally as the March for Science unfolds in approximately 400 locations around the world.

Bill Nye issued a statement about The Planetary Society’s participation (for the full statement, read Nye’s blog).

Nye described the March for Science as consistent with The Planetary Society’s values.

“Science is universal.” said Nye. “Space exploration brings out the best in us.”

We march to inspire unity. When we explore the cosmos, we come together and accomplish extraordinary things. Space science brings people of all walks of life together to solve problems and experience the unparalleled awe of exploration. Everyone – regardless of race, gender, nationality, creed or ability –  is welcome in our journey to advance space science.

“We march to advocate for space,” Nye added. “There’s a new movement for space exploration.”

Nye said that March for Science participation is consistent with Planetary Society cofounders’ legacy.

“Carl Sagan, my astronomy professor at Cornell University, cofounded The Planetary Society. He was a space science champion, advocate and communicator. He inspired the world to experience space science and delight in discoveries: achieved and within reach. His legacy lives on, through us: through you.”

Bill Nye’s full statement is published on his blog.

Omaze launched an official t-shirt campaign to benefit The Planetary Society during the March for Science and onward. The “Science is Universal” shirt is part of an ongoing movement for science literacy and space advocacy. The shirt is available at: http://omaze.com/bill

The Planetary Society shared participation details, including onsite and remote opportunities.

Citizens interested in marching with The Planetary Society can find details on the event page: http://planetary.org/march

Remote participation opportunities include a hashtag campaign #ScienceIsUniversal, which encourages science supporters around the world to submit photos in solidarity for science.

More information about The Planetary Society’s participation will be announced as March for Science program details are finalized.

About

The Planetary Society: The Planetary Society has inspired millions of people to explore other worlds and seek other life. With the mission to empower the world’s citizens to advance space science and exploration, its international membership makes the non-governmental Planetary Society the largest space interest group in the world. Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded The Planetary Society in 1980. Bill Nye, a longtime member of The Planetary Society’s Board, serves as CEO. www.planetary.org

March for Science, Mission: The March for Science champions robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good and for political leaders and policy makers to enact evidence based policies in the public interest. www.marchforscience.com

Media Resources

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About The Planetary Society

The Planetary Society has inspired millions of people to explore other worlds and seek other life. With the mission to empower the world’s citizens to advance space science and exploration, its international membership makes the non-governmental Planetary Society the largest space interest group in the world. Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded The Planetary Society in 1980. Bill Nye, a longtime member of The Planetary Society’s Board, serves as CEO.

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Bill Nye Joins March for Science as Honorary Co-chair, Speaker

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The Planetary Society Joins as Partner Organization

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

03/30/2017

CONTACT:

Erin Greeson

Email:

Phone: +1-626-793-5100

Pasadena, CA (30 March 2017) — The Planetary Society today announced that CEO Bill Nye (The Science Guy®) will join the global March for Science as a speaker and honorary Co-chair. The organization, the world’s largest non-governmental space interest group, announced its official partner role. Nye’s participation will occur at the Washington, D.C. event, and The Planetary Society will participate globally as the March for Science unfolds in approximately 400 locations around the world.

Bill Nye issued a statement about The Planetary Society’s participation (for the full statement, read Nye’s blog).

Nye described the March for Science as consistent with The Planetary Society’s values.

“Science is universal.” said Nye. “Space exploration brings out the best in us.”

We march to inspire unity. When we explore the cosmos, we come together and accomplish extraordinary things. Space science brings people of all walks of life together to solve problems and experience the unparalleled awe of exploration. Everyone – regardless of race, gender, nationality, creed or ability –  is welcome in our journey to advance space science.

“We march to advocate for space,” Nye added. “There’s a new movement for space exploration.”

Nye said that March for Science participation is consistent with Planetary Society cofounders’ legacy.

“Carl Sagan, my astronomy professor at Cornell University, cofounded The Planetary Society. He was a space science champion, advocate and communicator. He inspired the world to experience space science and delight in discoveries: achieved and within reach. His legacy lives on, through us: through you.”

Bill Nye’s full statement is published on his blog.

Omaze launched an official t-shirt campaign to benefit The Planetary Society during the March for Science and onward. The “Science is Universal” shirt is part of an ongoing movement for science literacy and space advocacy. The shirt is available at: http://omaze.com/bill

The Planetary Society shared participation details, including onsite and remote opportunities.

Citizens interested in marching with The Planetary Society can find details on the event page: http://planetary.org/march

Remote participation opportunities include a hashtag campaign #ScienceIsUniversal, which encourages science supporters around the world to submit photos in solidarity for science.

More information about The Planetary Society’s participation will be announced as March for Science program details are finalized.

About

The Planetary Society: The Planetary Society has inspired millions of people to explore other worlds and seek other life. With the mission to empower the world’s citizens to advance space science and exploration, its international membership makes the non-governmental Planetary Society the largest space interest group in the world. Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded The Planetary Society in 1980. Bill Nye, a longtime member of The Planetary Society’s Board, serves as CEO. www.planetary.org

March for Science, Mission: The March for Science champions robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good and for political leaders and policy makers to enact evidence based policies in the public interest. www.marchforscience.com

Media Resources

****

###

About The Planetary Society

The Planetary Society has inspired millions of people to explore other worlds and seek other life. With the mission to empower the world’s citizens to advance space science and exploration, its international membership makes the non-governmental Planetary Society the largest space interest group in the world. Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded The Planetary Society in 1980. Bill Nye, a longtime member of The Planetary Society’s Board, serves as CEO.

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