Diverse suppliers honored at 18th annual Star Awards

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Delta celebrated its top diverse suppliers and supplier diversity advocates at the company’s 18th annual Star Awards recognition event on March 22 at the Delta Flight Museum in Atlanta.

For 18 years, the Star Awards program has honored the contributions of Delta’s top small-business, minority-owned and women-owned suppliers, as well as internal Delta team members who champion supplier diversity.

Ed Bastian, Delta’s CEO, provided the keynote address, highlighting Delta and its partners’ advocacy of diversity and inclusion.

As a global airline, our strength lies in the diversity of our employees, our customers and our business partners,” said Bastian. “This is not only a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the success we’ve had together, but also at the same time to reaffirm our commitment to improve. The diverse backgrounds and ideas that Delta people and our partners share are driving the spirit of innovation as we transform our business.”

Star Awards honorees are nominated and selected by a review committee based on several categories including quality, value creation, innovation, customer service, cost savings and community involvement.

This year’s winners include:

  • Small Business of the Year – Aviation Repair Technologies, LLC
  • Minority-owned Business of the YearAerothrust Holdings, LLC
  • Woman-owned Business of the YearMESH Experience
  • Corporate Real Estate Business of the YearGreen Heart Enterprises
  • Delta Team of the Year – Corporate Real Estate
  • TJP (Tiffany Jackson-Pugh) Advocate of the Year – LaShawn Douglas
  • TJP (Tiffany Jackson-Pugh) Advocate of the Year – Margarita Paz
  • Trailblazer of the Year – Bruce McMillian, African Ascension

“This acknowledgment is fantastic for us all and we’re incredibly grateful,” said Fiona Blades, CEO of MESH Experience. “It’s really encouraging to see Delta supporting women-owned initiatives, equality and diversity.”

The Star Awards program and the company’s partnerships are built on Delta’s core values of honesty, integrity and respect.

“We are very grateful for the many suppliers that work so hard to assist us in delivering excellence in every area of our business,” said Karmetria Burton, General Manager –Supplier Diversity. “Our strategy is based on our collaboration, partnership and shared values. Working together, we are able to achieve mutual success.”

The Star Awards event has chronicled the growth and enhancement of Delta’s Supplier Diversity program, and is a reflection of Delta’s commitment to an inclusive culture.

Jim Clifton – 2017 Business Hall of Fame Honoree

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“Every once in a while, you have to bet everything or you won’t keep developing.”

 As CEO of Gallup, Jim Clifton has helped vault the organization into the upper echelon – a world-renowned leader in research, analytics and advice.

Raised in Lincoln, Clifton launched his career with Selection Research Inc. (SRI), a company founded by his father, the late Don Clifton. Jim led SRI’s acquisition of Gallup in 1988.

“It was a very competitive acquisition,” he recalls. “The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, News Corp… everyone came to Princeton to buy the organization after Dr. Gallup died. His sons took a special liking to us because we understood Dr. Gallup’s mission better than anyone else.”

He continues, “Every once in a while, you have to bet everything or you won’t keep developing. To say the least, we bet everything. Experts told us, ‘If you buy Gallup, you will go broke.’”

Since the acquisition and under Clifton’s leadership, Gallup has achieved a 15-fold increase in billing volume and expanded to a worldwide organization with 30 offices in 20 countries and regions.

Recent Clifton-driven innovations at Gallup include The Gallup Path, a model used in performance management systems in more than 500 companies worldwide, and The Gallup World Poll, which is designed to give the world’s seven billion citizens a voice in key global issues.

“If someone were to ask, ‘What are the citizens thinking in Venezuela, Russia, the Middle East or anywhere in the world?’, we have those answers.”

Clifton is the author of The Coming Jobs War and co-author of Entrepreneurial StrengthsFinder and an upcoming book, Born to Build. He serves on several boards, has received three honorary doctorates and is chairman of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund.

Clifton is being inducted into the Omaha Business Hall of Fame along with his younger sister, Jane Miller, who serves as Gallup’s chief operating officer.

Reality Check: New Equality Measure Targets Gender Bias in Ads and Media

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 Reality Check: New Equality Measure Targets Gender Bias in Ads and Media

 Association of National Advertisers Shares #SeeHer GEM™ (Gender Equality Measure) Methodology with Advertising Research Community

17,000-plus ads have been evaluated using GEM to assess realistic and accurate portrayal of girls and women in advertising and media

GEM™ brings equality into established pre- and post-testing equation

March 20, 2017, New York, NY— Gender bias is bad for business. Research proves that ads and entertainment in which women and girls are accurately portrayed generate significantly more awareness, recall, and purchase intent than ads in which they are not. Now the Association of National Advertisers’ Alliance for Family Entertainment (ANA AFE) has given the industry a potent, new, data-driven methodology to identify — and eliminate — gender bias.

At today’s Advertising Research Foundation (ARF) annual conference, ANA and leadership from its #SeeHer initiative shared the insights gleaned from, and questions used in, their Gender Equality Measure (GEM™) module, which helps business leaders make better decisions by addressing unconscious bias within media and programming.

The ANA AFE, a collective of the nation’s largest advertisers, launched the #SeeHer initiative last year in partnership with The Female Quotient (TFQ) to increase the accurate portrayal of women and girls in advertising and media by 20 percent by 2020, the 100th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote.

Aiding the advancement toward the 2020 goal, the GEM™ module measures ads and programming to help marketers improve planning choices and ROI. Since last summer, GEMTM has been used to evaluate over 17,000 ads, which the ANA believes constitutes the largest syndicated post-test in history. The research was conducted by AFE syndicated research partner Advertising Benchmark Index (ABX).

GEMTM measures perceptions of how female actors are portrayed in the media by asking consumers four key questions:

  • What is the overall opinion of the female presented?
  • Is she portrayed respectfully?
  • Is she depicted inappropriately?
  • Is she seen as a positive role model for women and girls?

„We are leading the #SeeHer movement for our industry because it makes good business sense and is good for society,” noted ANA CEO Bob Liodice. “Looking at the stats of post-test ads just last week, we are pleased to see that 80 percent of the highest scoring GEM ads are ANA members’ spots. Of course that represents a moment in time, but it clearly indicates that the #SeeHer movement is raising the awareness of marketers. It is a good start.  We must get to the point that no CMO will run any ad that shows gender bias.”

„The GEMTM measure will add a new dimension of equality to our research suite of industry standards which currently includes awareness, recall, purchase intent, and likeability,” said Shelley Zalis, #SeeHer co-founder and founder and CEO of TFQ. “We know that women do not lack confidence, but the media lacks confidence in its portrayal of women. We can only treasure what we can measure, so we are sharing GEMTM with the research industry.” 

Sharing the GEMTM methodology is the latest undertaking of an ongoing initiative to support marketer and media efforts to create content that is free of gender bias. The initiative has developed toolkits for advertisers to create unbiased messaging. In January, boot camps to teach #SeeHer members how to eliminate gender bias began.

“There are compelling insights that support SeeHer. Forty percent of women don’t identify with the women they see in ads; 90 percent of parents are concerned about TV programming, that there are no role models for girls; yet women make 85 percent of all consumer purchase decisions.” Stephen Quinn, ANA AFE chairman concluded, “We are all trying to become more customer-centric and these data show we have a distance to go. CMOs have an obligation to maximize marketing ROI and seize control over their brand by eliminating bias in their ads and ensuring their media buys include environments in which women and girls are portrayed the way they really are.

About the #SeeHer Initiative

Despite the strides made to accurately portray women and women in the media, an unconscious bias persists against women and girls in advertising, media, and programming The Association of National Advertisers (ANA) Alliance for Family Entertainment (AFE) launched the #SeeHer initiative in June 2016 in a joint partnership with The Female Quotient (TFQ’s) Girl’s Lounge, at the White House as part of the United State of Women event. The #SeeHer Initiative mission is to accurately portray all women and girls in media by 2020, the 100th anniversary of women winning the right to vote.  For more information, visit www.SeeHer.com, follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

ABOUT THE ANA

The ANA (Association of National Advertisers) makes a difference for individuals, brands, and our marketing community by advancing the interests of marketers and promoting and protecting the well-being of the marketing industry. Founded in 1910, the ANA provides leadership that advances marketing excellence and shapes the future of the industry. The ANA’s membership includes more than 1,000 companies with 15,000 brands that collectively spend or support more than $250 billion in marketing and advertising annually. The membership is comprised of more than 700 client-side marketers and nearly 250 Associate Members, which include leading agencies, law firms, suppliers, consultants, and vendors. Further enriching the ecosystem is the work of the nonprofit Advertising Educational Foundation (AEF), an ANA subsidiary. The AEF’s mission is to enhance the understanding of advertising and marketing within the academic and marketing communities.

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Samsung Electronics Completes Acquisition of HARMAN

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SEOUL, KOREA AND STAMFORD, CONN., MARCH 10, 2017 – Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (KRX: 005930) (“Samsung”) today announced it has completed the previously announced acquisition of Harman International Industries, Incorporated (“HARMAN”). Under the terms of the merger agreement, HARMAN stockholders will receive $112.00 per share in cash. The completion follows the satisfaction of all conditions to the closing of the transaction, including approval of the transaction by HARMAN stockholders and receipt of all necessary regulatory approvals in the United States and certain foreign jurisdictions.

Today is a historic moment for us. The close of this transaction opens the door to create substantial growth opportunities and deliver greater benefits for customers worldwide,” said Young Sohn, President and Chief Strategy Officer of Samsung Electronics, and Chairman of the Board, HARMAN. “We see transformative opportunities in the car – and a future which seamlessly connects lifestyle across automotive, home, mobile and work. Samsung’s and HARMAN’s leadership in these spaces perfectly positions Samsung to be the preferred partner to our OEM customers. In addition, bringing together HARMAN’s iconic audio brands and capabilities paired with Samsung’s leading display technologies will deliver enhanced audio and video experiences to consumers and professional end markets. And most importantly, we are enthusiastic about our common vision, the similarities in our culture of innovation, and the added value we can create for customers. We look forward to working with all of HARMAN’s employees to execute on our vision.”

“We are excited to have completed the transaction, which provides compelling cash value to our stockholders, benefits our customers and provides new opportunities for our employees,” said Dinesh Paliwal, HARMAN President and CEO. “Samsung shares our commitment to our customers and our culture of speed, innovation and execution. Samsung provides HARMAN with the scale, platform and complementary technologies to accelerate growth and extend our global market leadership in automotive, smart audio and connected technologies. Recognizing the importance of partnerships in an increasingly connected world, particularly in automotive, we are poised to leverage our combined teams and resources to produce even greater value for our customers. Working closely with automakers and other technology companies, Samsung and HARMAN will define – and drive – the future of automotive.”

In connection with the completion of the transaction, HARMAN’s common stock will cease trading prior to market open on March 13, 2017 and will be delisted from the New York Stock Exchange. HARMAN will operate as a standalone Samsung subsidiary, overseen by a Board of Directors led by Mr. Sohn. Mr. Paliwal will remain CEO of HARMAN, leading the Company with his management team, and will continue to serve as a member of its Board. Samsung is retaining HARMAN’s work force, headquarters and facilities, as well as all of its consumer and professional audio brands.

About Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.

Samsung inspires the world and shapes the future with transformative ideas and technologies. The company is redefining the worlds of TVs, smartphones, wearable devices, tablets, digital appliances, network systems, and semiconductor and LED solutions. For the latest news, please visit the Samsung Newsroom at news.samsung.com.

About HARMAN

HARMAN (harman.com) designs and engineers connected products and solutions for automakers, consumers, and enterprises worldwide, including connected car systems, audio and visual products, enterprise automation solutions; and connected services. With leading brands including AKG®, Harman Kardon®, Infinity®, JBL®, Lexicon®, Mark Levinson® and Revel®, HARMAN is admired by audiophiles, musicians and the entertainment venues where they perform around the world. More than 25 million automobiles on the road today are equipped with HARMAN audio and connected car systems. The Company’s software services power billions of mobile devices and systems that are connected, integrated and secure across all platforms, from work and home to car and mobile. HARMAN has a workforce of approximately 30,000 people across the Americas, Europe, and Asia.

Investor Contacts:

For Samsung

Oh-Hyung Kwon

+82 (0) 2-2255-8134

ohhyung.kwon@samsung.com

Media Contacts:

For Samsung

Jim Barron or Devin Broda

Sard Verbinnen & Co

1-212-687-8080

SamsungMedia@sardverb.com 

For HARMAN

Jamie Moser, Andrew Siegel or Joseph Sala

Joele Frank, Wilkinson Brimmer Katcher

1-212-355-4449

Warnings over children’s health as recycled e-waste comes back as plastic toys

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https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2017/mar/09/plastics-re…

A trend towards using plastic parts in electrical and electronic goods is causing a headache for the recycling industry
Arthur Neslen

Flame retardants used in plastics in a wide range of electronic products is putting the health of children exposed to them at risk, according to a new report (pdf).

Brominated flame-retarding chemicals have been associated with lower mental, psychomotor and IQ development, poorer attention spans and decreases in memory and processing speed, according to the peer-reviewed study by the campaign group CHEM Trust.

“The brain development of future generations is at stake,” says Dr Michael Warhurst, CHEM Trust’s director. “We need EU regulators to phase out groups of chemicals of concern, rather than slowly restricting one chemical at a time. We cannot continue to gamble with our children’s health.”

The issue poses questions about recycled products that have been imported from countries with less robust recycling rules, such as China.

In 2014 China generated 3.2bn tonnes of industrial solid waste, of which 2bn tonnes was recycled, recovered, incinerated or reused, according to a study in Nature. But concerns about its waste treatment standards were heightened by the discovery of some of the highest concentrations of PBDE chemicals (a group of brominated flame retardants) ever recorded in the food chain near the country’s e-waste recycling plants in the same year.

A trend towards using plastic parts instead of metals in electrical and electronic goods is also causing a headache for the circular economy because so many plastics use toxic flame retardants.

One 2015 study (pdf) found significant traces of two potentially hormone-altering brominated flame retardants in 43% of 21 children’s toys surveyed, including toy robots, hockey sticks and finger skateboards. The substances are often found in the recycled plastics first used in electronic products.

Last month the European commission moved to restrict the use of one such substance, DecaBDE, but also allowed exemptions for spare car parts and aviation, and longer deferral periods for recycled materials containing the substance.

A subsequent European Environmental Bureau report called on the commission to limit the amount of hazardous materials in circulation and ensure the appropriate decontamination of hazardous waste before recovery.

At high doses persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as DecaBDE may have carcinogenic (pdf) effects and environmentalists have protested to the commission (pdf) about their potential reuse. POPs can accumulate in living bodies and be transported far from their places of origin by atmospheric circulation and ocean currents.

The Arctic, for example, has experienced a huge build up of POPs even though they are not produced there, with Innuit peoples in Nunavut recording extraordinarily high chemical concentrations in their bloodstreams.

That poses concerns for health professionals but also for European businesses. Under EU law companies must remove and send listed POPs to high-temperature incineration plants where they can be turned into salts and waters. However, this removes a plastic waste stream from revenue-generating recycling materials, making it more costly and difficult to meet recycling obligations.

Plastics in electrical goods may be safely incinerated en masse when disposed of by responsible hazardous-waste disposal centres.

But environmentalists argue that EU regulations allow the collection and recycling of material containing dangerously high levels of POPs, while information about chemical toxicity is not properly passed along the whole product lifecycle.

The substances may still be found in imported products that have been recycled in countries like China, according to Professor Olaf Wirth of the Okopol Institute, who has advised the German federal environment agency.

“Many big name toy-makers produce in China and don’t have a problem as they tell the producers what to do and what is forbidden in the EU,” says Wirth. “If you just buy something on the market because you like the design then you may bring products into the EU that contain substances that are not allowed.

Wirth is sympathetic to environmentalists and firefighters who question the need for flame retardants in most electrical products, although national regulations often require them.

Philip Morton, the outgoing CEO of Repic, the UK’s largest e-waste producer compliance scheme, told the Guardian that handling POPs is “the next big thing” for manufacturers.

“Whereas steel is just steel, plastic is not just plastic,” says Morton. “There are a number of different grades and additives that should be on everyone’s radar. More things will soon start appearing on the ‘POP list’ and that has the potential to become very difficult [for industry].”

The commission is expected to bring forward an amendment of its POP regulation later this year, to update producer obligations. Meanwhile designers are in an ongoing race to turn out product models that are well labelled, easily dissembled and simple to recycle.

“Going forward there will have to be stronger connections between manufacturers and the designers of their products as it’s a closed loop and producers putting these products on the market will ultimately pay for recycling at the end of a product’s life,” says Morton.

New Award in remembrance of a chemist and patron of the arts

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TUM-president Prof. Wolfgang A. Herrmann (left) with Clariant-CEO Dr. Hariolf Kottmann and Susanne Wamsler after signing the agreement for the new award. (Image: Benz / TUM)

10.03.2017,  Campus news

Specialty chemicals company Clariant and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) yesterday signed an agreement covering the joint presentation of a new award: The „Dr. Karl Wamsler Innovation Award” will promote excellent performance in the field of ca-talysis, including bio-catalysis and White Biotechnology. Clariant has agreed to support the award with an annual amount of 100,000 Euros over the next ten years.

The funding will cover a cash award of 50,000 Euros and the costs of the awards ceremony as well as the related administrative costs incurred by the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The award was initiated by Clariant and is inspired by the memory of Dr. Karl Wamsler, who passed away on June 18, 2016.

In the future, once a year Clariant will join together with the TUM Department of Chemistry to present the Dr. Karl Wamsler Innovation Award as a part of the TUM Awards Dinner. The winner will be chosen by an expert jury that includes the President of the TUM, the Dean of the Department of Chemistry and two representatives from Clariant. Call for submissions starts in April 2017, with the awards ceremony to take place on December 4, 2017 at the beginning of ceremonies celebrating the 150th anniversary of the founding of the TUM.

An influential personality in Bavarian Economy

Dr. Karl Wamsler was one of the most important and formative figures in post-war German chemistry. He was also one of the most influential personalities in the Bavarian economy. We have initiated this In-novation Award in commemoration of his achievements,” said Clariant CEO Dr. Hariolf Kottmann. He continued: „Catalysts play a fundamental role in chemical processes in terms of both economic viability and sustainability. Collaboration between research and development is of essential importance if we want to make progress in the field of catalysis. This is why Clariant in particular, as one of world’s leading companies in the field of heterogeneous catalysis, has a duty to recognize outstanding work in this field. This is entirely in the spirit of Dr. Karl Wamsler.”

Dr. Karl Wamsler was a generous patron when it came to supporting science and the arts. In 1963 Dr. Karl Wamsler was installed as a deputy member of the Süd-Chemie Managing Board and become a full Board member one year later. The Supervisory Board named him Chairman of the Managing Board in 1984. He continued in this capacity until 1992 and after his 30 year association with corporate leadership he moved on to the Supervisory Board, where he was Chairman until 2004.

Because of his remarkable service to the company, the Supervisory Board named him its Honorary Chairman. As a family share-holder, Karl Wamsler was closely tied to Süd-Chemie. After the acquisition of Süd-Chemie by Clariant he maintained this close connection and played a highly active role in the company’s continuing develop-ment until his death. In 2015 the TUM awarded Karl Wamsler the rank of Honorary Senator in recognition of his exemplary dedication on behalf of the TUM University Foundation.

Future solutions for engergy from biogenic materials

„It will be an honor and a pleasure for us in the future to join Clariant in rewarding outstanding research in the field of catalysis in commemoration of Dr. Karl Wamsler,” said Prof. Wolfgang A. Herrmann, President of the TUM. „Catalysis is enormously important, and not only for the chemical industry. Only with the help of catalysis will we be able to find for example solutions for the generation, storage and conversion of energy from biogenic raw materials.” 

Clariant and TUM can already look back on many years of close collaboration in the area of catalysis. The TUM Catalysis Research Center, opened in 2016, is the location of MuniCat, the strategic research partnership between the University and the specialty chemicals company Clariant, whose Catalysts business unit is one of the world’s leading developers and manufacturers of catalysts for industrial processes. Here researchers from Clariant work together with colleagues from the TUM on important key issues in fundamental research and application research in the field of chemical catalysis.

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ANU and business leaders to boost collaboration

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Some of Australia’s top business leaders joined executives from The Australian National University (ANU) on Friday as part of a major plan to bolster collaboration and research between the University and Australian industry.

The inaugural meeting of the ANU Business and Industry Advisory Board was led by ANU Vice-Chancellor Professor Brian Schmidt AC and Advisory Board Chair Brian Hartzer, Chief Executive Officer of Westpac, alongside leaders from key industries such as biotech, aerospace and engineering.

The ANU Business and Industry Advisory Board is a key initiative of Professor Schmidt, designed to build bridges between business, academics and researchers and foster greater collaboration and investment in shared ideas and knowledge.

A contemporary national university should lead the charge in how universities and industry work together,” Professor Schmidt said.

„ANU is determined to improve Australia’s innovation economy, and I am grateful to the outstanding leaders from across business and industry who have joined our Advisory Board.

„They are helping us redefine University-industry engagement at this critical time in Australia’s economic transition.”

Other members of the ANU Advisory Board are Maureen Dougherty (President of Boeing Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific), Michelle Burke (Director of AusBiotech), Dr Jennifer MacDiarmid (CEO of EnGeneIC), Catherine Ball (CEO Executive of Remote Research Ranges) and Anthony Goldbloom (CEO of Kaggle).

Mr Hartzer said he was delighted to chair the ANU Advisory Board.

„To continue to thrive, Australia needs strong relationships between academia and business,” he said.

„Westpac’s core purpose is to support the economic growth of Australia, so I am delighted to work with the ANU as Chair of the Business and Industry Advisory Board, which will help build knowledge, collaboration and innovation where it matters most.”

As Australia’s national university, ANU is a strong advocate of driving research that translates into outcomes that contribute to society and the national economy.

Among the successful businesses to grow from ANU research are companies such as NuCoria and Beta Therapeutics, Lithicon and Liquid Instruments.

Professor Schmidt said ANU wanted to maximise the opportunities for great ideas and research at ANU.

ANU and business leaders to boost collaboration

Submit the press release

Some of Australia’s top business leaders joined executives from The Australian National University (ANU) on Friday as part of a major plan to bolster collaboration and research between the University and Australian industry.

The inaugural meeting of the ANU Business and Industry Advisory Board was led by ANU Vice-Chancellor Professor Brian Schmidt AC and Advisory Board Chair Brian Hartzer, Chief Executive Officer of Westpac, alongside leaders from key industries such as biotech, aerospace and engineering.

The ANU Business and Industry Advisory Board is a key initiative of Professor Schmidt, designed to build bridges between business, academics and researchers and foster greater collaboration and investment in shared ideas and knowledge.

A contemporary national university should lead the charge in how universities and industry work together,” Professor Schmidt said.

„ANU is determined to improve Australia’s innovation economy, and I am grateful to the outstanding leaders from across business and industry who have joined our Advisory Board.

„They are helping us redefine University-industry engagement at this critical time in Australia’s economic transition.”

Other members of the ANU Advisory Board are Maureen Dougherty (President of Boeing Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific), Michelle Burke (Director of AusBiotech), Dr Jennifer MacDiarmid (CEO of EnGeneIC), Catherine Ball (CEO Executive of Remote Research Ranges) and Anthony Goldbloom (CEO of Kaggle).

Mr Hartzer said he was delighted to chair the ANU Advisory Board.

„To continue to thrive, Australia needs strong relationships between academia and business,” he said.

„Westpac’s core purpose is to support the economic growth of Australia, so I am delighted to work with the ANU as Chair of the Business and Industry Advisory Board, which will help build knowledge, collaboration and innovation where it matters most.”

As Australia’s national university, ANU is a strong advocate of driving research that translates into outcomes that contribute to society and the national economy.

Among the successful businesses to grow from ANU research are companies such as NuCoria and Beta Therapeutics, Lithicon and Liquid Instruments.

Professor Schmidt said ANU wanted to maximise the opportunities for great ideas and research at ANU.

ANU and business leaders to boost collaboration

Submit the press release

Some of Australia’s top business leaders joined executives from The Australian National University (ANU) on Friday as part of a major plan to bolster collaboration and research between the University and Australian industry.

The inaugural meeting of the ANU Business and Industry Advisory Board was led by ANU Vice-Chancellor Professor Brian Schmidt AC and Advisory Board Chair Brian Hartzer, Chief Executive Officer of Westpac, alongside leaders from key industries such as biotech, aerospace and engineering.

The ANU Business and Industry Advisory Board is a key initiative of Professor Schmidt, designed to build bridges between business, academics and researchers and foster greater collaboration and investment in shared ideas and knowledge.

A contemporary national university should lead the charge in how universities and industry work together,” Professor Schmidt said.

„ANU is determined to improve Australia’s innovation economy, and I am grateful to the outstanding leaders from across business and industry who have joined our Advisory Board.

„They are helping us redefine University-industry engagement at this critical time in Australia’s economic transition.”

Other members of the ANU Advisory Board are Maureen Dougherty (President of Boeing Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific), Michelle Burke (Director of AusBiotech), Dr Jennifer MacDiarmid (CEO of EnGeneIC), Catherine Ball (CEO Executive of Remote Research Ranges) and Anthony Goldbloom (CEO of Kaggle).

Mr Hartzer said he was delighted to chair the ANU Advisory Board.

„To continue to thrive, Australia needs strong relationships between academia and business,” he said.

„Westpac’s core purpose is to support the economic growth of Australia, so I am delighted to work with the ANU as Chair of the Business and Industry Advisory Board, which will help build knowledge, collaboration and innovation where it matters most.”

As Australia’s national university, ANU is a strong advocate of driving research that translates into outcomes that contribute to society and the national economy.

Among the successful businesses to grow from ANU research are companies such as NuCoria and Beta Therapeutics, Lithicon and Liquid Instruments.

Professor Schmidt said ANU wanted to maximise the opportunities for great ideas and research at ANU.

ANU and business leaders to boost collaboration

Submit the press release

Some of Australia’s top business leaders joined executives from The Australian National University (ANU) on Friday as part of a major plan to bolster collaboration and research between the University and Australian industry.

The inaugural meeting of the ANU Business and Industry Advisory Board was led by ANU Vice-Chancellor Professor Brian Schmidt AC and Advisory Board Chair Brian Hartzer, Chief Executive Officer of Westpac, alongside leaders from key industries such as biotech, aerospace and engineering.

The ANU Business and Industry Advisory Board is a key initiative of Professor Schmidt, designed to build bridges between business, academics and researchers and foster greater collaboration and investment in shared ideas and knowledge.

A contemporary national university should lead the charge in how universities and industry work together,” Professor Schmidt said.

„ANU is determined to improve Australia’s innovation economy, and I am grateful to the outstanding leaders from across business and industry who have joined our Advisory Board.

„They are helping us redefine University-industry engagement at this critical time in Australia’s economic transition.”

Other members of the ANU Advisory Board are Maureen Dougherty (President of Boeing Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific), Michelle Burke (Director of AusBiotech), Dr Jennifer MacDiarmid (CEO of EnGeneIC), Catherine Ball (CEO Executive of Remote Research Ranges) and Anthony Goldbloom (CEO of Kaggle).

Mr Hartzer said he was delighted to chair the ANU Advisory Board.

„To continue to thrive, Australia needs strong relationships between academia and business,” he said.

„Westpac’s core purpose is to support the economic growth of Australia, so I am delighted to work with the ANU as Chair of the Business and Industry Advisory Board, which will help build knowledge, collaboration and innovation where it matters most.”

As Australia’s national university, ANU is a strong advocate of driving research that translates into outcomes that contribute to society and the national economy.

Among the successful businesses to grow from ANU research are companies such as NuCoria and Beta Therapeutics, Lithicon and Liquid Instruments.

Professor Schmidt said ANU wanted to maximise the opportunities for great ideas and research at ANU.